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Hi,

I am one of the men who collects/collect the garbage.

I am one of the group that designs/design our booster rockets.

I am one of a type which is/are allergic to cats.

I am one of a school which rejects/reject violence.

Thanks, - A. Emotion: smile
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I guess:

I am one of the men who collect the garbage.

I am one of the group that designs (AmE) /design (BrE) our booster rockets.

I am one of a type which is allergic to cats.

I am one of a school which rejects violence.
Many thanks, MrM.
I've been struggling with the collective noun question. I believe in many cases the number of the verb is optional, but I was wondering if "I am one of" effects the choice, pushing the noun toward the collective.

Best wishes, - A.
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I feel your pain. I think the nature of the noun pushes back: that's why I chose the singular for 'school', which I feel is strongly a singular entity, while 'group' is very pluralish. 'Type', I'm sure, would never draw the plural.
Mister Micawber I think the nature of the noun pushes back:
I take your point. Thanks again.
I think I'm realizing that "I'm one of a type" is not that different from "I'm of a type."
Mister Micawber'Type', I'm sure, would never draw the plural.
The British seem to go for plural verbs after quite a few singular nouns. This 'decadent usage' -- as an American friend of mine calls it -- began in the 19th century. A Google search for "of the type who are" gives 34,000 hits and "the type who are" gives 289,000 hits.

I'm not saying that anything is right or wrong here! Emotion: smile Just presenting some statistics.

CB
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Hi guys

I read recently that when a collective noun is preceded by a singular determiner such as a/an, every, each, this and that, it is always used with a singular verb.

For that reason you would have

I am one of a group that desings...(in both AmE and BrE)

I am one of a school which + singular verb
I know better than to use the word 'never', too.
IvanhrI read recently that when a collective noun is preceded by a singular determiner such as a/an, every, each, this and that, it is always used with a singular verb.
I run away from grammarians who use the word always.Emotion: wink

CB
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