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Hi there

I'm sooooo glad to be here. These forums have always been a great help for me and for so many people I believe.

Sooooo I highly appreciate and thank everyone who is behind this terrific work.

I have a question concerning collocations & idioms of the word BLOOD. ( Oops my start is full of blood, believe me im much kinder than that! Lol Emotion: stick out tongue)

Our prof asked us to give precise definitions concerning each idiom. He is hardly satisfied with our answers.Emotion: sad

Sooooo may u help me????

The difference between the following:

1. to let blood to shed blood to spill blood to lose blood

2. blood clots blood congeals blood coagulates blood curdles

3. blood runs cold blood freezes

4. elevated blood pressure high blood pressure

5. to draw blood to draw first blood

6. fresh/new blood the old blood

In the following idioms, he gave us one meaning (between parentheses) and required for another.

Blue blood ( of noble family)

Royal blood ( of royal family)

One more question …. Is the idiom (blood test) involves the examination of your blood by doctors to determine its type or just to make judgment about your medical condition??

Sorry I know it's a long post. I'm much obliged to all of u.Emotion: embarrassed

THANX IN ADVANCE
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for related idioms, search with blood here:
http://www.answers.com/library/Idioms
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1. to let blood to shed blood When used as an idiom, this one means that you worked really, really hard. "We shed blood and tears over that project." to spill blood to lose blood I don't know these others as idoms.

2. blood clots blood congeals blood coagulates blood curdles Only this one is an idiom and used as blood-curdling. Something really, really scary. "A blood-curdling scream rang out."

3. blood runs cold You're frightened of this. "My blood runs cold at the thought." blood freezes

4. elevated blood pressure high blood pressure This one could be used to mean creating anxiety for me. "Don't do that! You're giving me high blood pressure."

5. to draw blood to draw first blood As inchoate said... either of these can be idioms.

6. fresh/new blood the old blood While I do hear "fresh blood" meaning someone new on a team or just someone who can bring a new perspective, I think I've heard "old guard" more than "old blood" to mean the people who are established, who have been part of something for a long time.
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Comments  
Thank you Marius for your help. But unfortunately I didn't find satisfying answers for all the idioms here. Most are not found. If you please, help me particularly with no. 5 & 6.
you can draw blood with your comments that most people find irritating.
if you join a company you are a new blood there; seniors are old blood.
they are part of the furniture, they say.

to draw first blood means to hurt(metaforically, literally) your opponent before they do. In a debate if you draw first blood you win.

inchoate
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.