Hi. I am trying to combine the following two ideas.
 
1. Our colleges should have been an ivory tower that encourage students to pursue their studies.

Instead,

2. Our colleges have been an ivory tower that reacts sensitively to political changes.
 
 
And this is what I have come up with to the best of my ability.
 
My main focus has been trying to avoid using "an ivory tower" twice. BUT I am not sure whether it is grammatically correct.

"Our colleges have been an ivory tower that reacts sensitively to political changes
rather than allowing students to pursuit their studies."
 
And if it's, by any chance, correct, I want to know whether the underlined phrase accurately 
has "an ivory tower" as its subject rather than "our colleges"
1 2
There's nothing grammatically wrong with your suggested sentence but it doesn't really scan very well.

Here's one possible way to phrase your thoughts:

Our college has been acting more like a politically sensitive ivory tower than an educational institution where our students can pursue their studies.
Hi,

Because you are speaking of colleges in the plural, you need to speak of towers in the plural.

I am trying to combine the following two ideas.
 
1. Our colleges should have been an ivory tower that encourage students to pursue their studies.

Instead,

2. Our colleges have been an ivory tower that reacts sensitively to political changes.

Your suggestion has problems,as you already suspect.
I suggest this.
Our colleges should have been ivory towers that encourage students to pursue their studies,
but i
nstead they have been ivory towers that react sensitively to political changes.
Or perhaps this.
Our colleges have been ivory towers, but
they have reacted sensitively to political changes
 instead of encouraging students to pursue their studies. 

Clive
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Thanks for your suggestion.

I like your first suggested sentence.

is there any way to not use the "ivory towers" twice?

Also, I have come up with another sentence of my own. Wonder how it sounds...

Our colleges have been ivory towers that only react sensitively to political changes, not the ivory towers that allow students pursue their studies.
Just so you know, "ivory tower" is almost always pejorative.
Hi,

I like your first suggested sentence.

is there any way to not use the "ivory towers" twice? You could use my second sentence.

Also, I have come up with another sentence of my own. Wonder how it sounds... It's OK.

Our colleges have been ivory towers that only react sensitively to political changes, not --the-- ivory towers that allow students to pursue their studies.

Note the recent comment that 'ivory towers' is a rather negative expression. If that is no your intention,a more neutral expression is eg 'institutions'.

Clive
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IF it could be used in non-pejorative way, would the following sentence sound alright?

"Our colleges have been the ivory tower that reacts sensitively to political changes, not the ivory tower that allows students pursue their studies."
Our colleges have been ivory towers that only react sensitively to political changes, not --the-- ivory towers that allow students to pursue their studies.

Are you saying "the" should be taken out?
Hi,

Our colleges have been ivory towers that only react sensitively to political changes, not --the-- ivory towers that allow students to pursue their studies.

Are you saying "the" should be taken out?

Yes. The crossing-out function on the Forum does not seem to work.

Clive
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