If Joe and Bob share ownership of an order of onion rings, and I want to express this to Joe as concisely as possible (in American English), what do I say?

Thanks!

Jason
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These onion rings are for you and Bob.

These onion rings belong to you and Bob.

(I prefer the first, since generally with food it's more likely to be a question of who is expected to eat the food rather than a question of ownership.)
Thank you. What about something like, "These onion rings are yours and Bob's"? Is there a correct way to state it using a form like that, and, if so, would your examples still be preferred?

Thanks again,

Jason
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JasonC"These onion rings are yours and Bob's"?
This is fine too.
Thanks.

One final question, then. Just out of curiosity, if I wanted to put the subject after the possessives, how would I form that? Is that even possible? "These are your and Bob's onion rings"?

Jason
I was just thinking of coming back and adding that option. "These are your and Bob's onion rings" is correct. Your instinct is good!

And welcome to the Forum, Jason!
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Let me add one more thought -- although I believe "These are your and Bob's onion rings" and "These onion rings are yours and Bob's," are both correct, they both sound awkward. Even a native speaker might have to stop and think about them. It would be more natural to avoid the double possessive altogether and say something like "these onion rings are for you and Bob to share."

It gets even more awkward if you try to combine possessives of first and second, or first and third person. ("These are my and Bob's onion rings" is probably correct, but it sounds terrible!) Just avoid it and re-phrase the sentence.

Okay, now I'm hungry for onion rings!
khoff"These are your and Bob's onion rings" is correct.
Wouldn't only the final item take the possessive in cases of shared ownership - as in Mary and Bob's onion rings, Tom and Karen's house, Fred and Lucy's car?

But 'your' is possessive and 'Bob's' is possessive, so how about:

These are you and Bob's onion rings.

Or, I suppose,

These are Bob and your onion rings.

CJ
khoff("These are my and Bob's onion rings" is probably correct, but it sounds terrible!) Just avoid it and re-phrase the sentence.
I agree that rephrasing is best if the situation is formal, but we have to recognize two solutions to this problem that occur surprisingly often in casual speech, and both are offered quite unselfconsciously by those who generate them.

These are me and Bob's onion rings.

These are Bob and I's onion rings.

Emotion: smile

CJ
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