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Do these all work? If not, why not?

I have received a mail from her which says that she will come to N.Y tomorrow.
I have received a mail from her which says that she is coming to N.Y tomorrow.
I have received a mail from her which says that she comes to N.Y tomorrow.
I have received a mail from her which says that she is going to come to N.Y tomorrow.
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Comments  
TakaDo these all work?
Yes.

CJ
Hi,

I have received a mail
Note this is incorrect English, although a lot of English learners seem to say it.

Correct is
eg I have received an email (via computer)

eg I have received a letter (usually on paper)

Clive
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CliveHi,I have received a mail Note this is incorrect English, although a lot of English learners seem to say it.Correct iseg I have received an email (via computer) eg I have received a letter (usually on paper)Clive
'Mail' can be used as 'e-mail', and 'e-mail' can be countable, can't it?
CalifJim TakaDo these all work?Yes.CJ
Jim, how would you interpret the 'will' in that example? Do you think it indicates simple futurity? Or do you think it indicates willingness?

Or you think it's ambiguous?
"I have recieved a mail from..." is ungrammatical (this sounds really bad). You need to say "an email."

The 1st, 2nd, and 4th sentences are okay. The 3rd sentence is technically correct, from a purely technical-grammatical point of view, but it doesn't sound right. The construction "...that she comes to..." sounds pompous, like she's royalty; people don't talk like this today.
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Hi,

For email, native speakers say eg -
I received an email.
I received 3 emails.
I received some emails.
I received some mail. (meaning some email)

But not I received a mail.
But not I received 3 mails.

Clive
CliveHi,For email, native speakers say eg -I received an email.I received 3 emails.I received some emails.I received some mail. (meaning some email)But not I received a mail.But not I received 3 mails. Clive
Really? Hmm...OK.

What about the parts in bold? Do you think they all work?
Hi,

I have received a mail from her which says that she comes to N.Y tomorrow.

I agree with the anonymous poster who said the version above sounds a bit like she is royalty.
It's correct grammar, but it seems a bit portentous, at least when you view the sentence in isolation..

It could fit in a larger context where you already know that she is coming, and you are just not sure when.
eg
A: When does your mother arrive?
B: She comes tomorrow.

Clive
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