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In the following sentences, I am guessing from the context that the "come" means "when/if (Election Day) comes". Is it actually acting as a conjunction?

Ms. TANDEN: And so the question for them is whether they can actually walk and chew gum: defend their vote, defend legislation and talk about economic issues in their district.
ROVNER: She says if they can't, things may turn grim for the Democrats come Election Day.
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Hi,

In the following sentences, I am guessing from the context that the "come" means "when/if (Election Day) comes". Yes.

Is it actually acting as a conjunction? It's really just a folksy, non-standard way of speaking. I'd put a comma in front of it.
Don't use it in exams or formal English.

Ms. TANDEN: And so the question for them is whether they can actually walk and chew gum: defend their vote, defend legislation and talk about economic issues in their district.

ROVNER: She says if they can't, things may turn grim for the Democrats come Election Day.

Clive
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darekaIs it actually acting as a conjunction?
It's a present subjunctive form of come. In English the same verb form is used for several purposes. Unlike Clive, I see nothing wrong with using it in serious writing.

CB
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Clive, Cool Breeze, thank you for answering my question.

>It's a present subjunctive form of come.
It was not in my mind that this is a possibility. Or I forgot such a thing exists in English....
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dareka>It's a present subjunctive form of come.
It was not in my mind that this is a possibility. Or I forgot such a thing exists in English....
English grammar is both easy and difficult at the same time. My apologies for using the wrong article. I should of course have written the present subjunctive form of come because there is only one. I make mistakes like this when my mind races ahead of what I write!Emotion: embarrassed

CB