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When a person says, you can come and get it, could I answer with:

I'm gonna ask my friend from to come get it.(asking my friend to go over to another person's place to retrieve something for me.) Or does it have to be

I'm gonna ask my friend to go get it.

Thank you.
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"gonna" is a very casual way of writing "going to". Do not get into the habit of routinely spelling it this way. Use "gonna" only when you are transcribing dialogue and you specifically want to emphasise the casual nature of that dialogue.

In the scenario you describe, I think I would use "come". (I would always say "come and get it", but I believe that omitting "and" is accepted in AmE.)

You have a typo (I assume): "I'm gonna ask my friend from to come get it."
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But I'm asking my friend to go to someone else's place to go get something for me. Would it still be come, 'cause he's not coming to me.
PreciousJones
But I'm asking my friend to go to someone else's place to go get something for me. Would it still be come, 'cause he's not coming to me.

I know it might seem illogical, but "come" is still natural (to me, anyway).

The other person says "You can come and get it". When you answer "I'm going to ask my friend to come and get it", you are echoing the other person's "come", as if you were momentarily putting yourself in their position.

If you were referring to your friend going to a location distant from both you and the person you're speaking to, then it would be "go". For example, suppose that none of you are currently at the office:

Other person: "I noticed you left your bag at the office".

You: "I'll ask my friend to go and get it".