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Hi,
Please see the use of the word ‘come' in the sentences below.
I not clear about it. Is such a construction used only for future references?
Can one use 'came july' to refer to past instances?

1. California could run out of cash come July.
2. Come July, pay your electricity bill at the post office.


Thanks
MG.
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It's a shortened phrase = "when July comes around".

It can be used in the past, as is: We greatly anticipated our trip. Come time to board the ship, we could hardly contain our enthusiasm.
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MusicgoldHi,
Please see the use of the word ‘come' in the sentences below.
I not clear about it. Is such a construction used only for future references?
Can one use 'came july' to refer to past instances?
1. California could run out of cash come July.
2. Come July, pay your electricity bill at the post office.

According to Macmillan English Dictionary for Advanced Learners, 'come' is a preposition. It means 'at a particular time in the future or when a particular event happens': Come summer, all the building work should be finished.
Philip and Yoong Liat,

Thanks.
Philip We greatly anticipated our trip. Come time to board the ship, we could hardly contain our enthusiasm.
Shouldn't it be 'came time to board...'

Also can I say ?

The family's farm did not produce enough crop that year. Came December, they did not have any food left.

MG.
MusicgoldPhilip and Yoong Liat,

Thanks.
Philip We greatly anticipated our trip. Come time to board the ship, we could hardly contain our enthusiasm.
Shouldn't it be 'came time to board...'

Also can I say ?

The family's farm did not produce enough crop that year. Came December, they did not have any food left.

MG.

As Yoong Liat has mentioned, it is considered a preposition, so it has no tense. In fact, her reference states that it should refer only to the future (with which I disagree).

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Actually, her reference states that it should refer to a time in the future OR to when a particular event happens, which may also be in the past, e.g. the boarding of the ship