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What do you native speakers think, or feel, the implication of 'on' in 'come on' which makes 'come on' semantically a bit different from simple 'come'?
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Interesting..I haven't thought about this before, though I have been learning Eng. for 7 years..
I thought we had this discussion once before, but I can't find it through "Search".

"on" adds encouragement. "over" emphasizes the trajectory. "here" or "there" emphasizes the destination. "come" and "go" are hardly ever used 'bare' compared to all the other variants.

come here, come over here,
come on, come on over,
come on here, come on over here,

go there, go over there,
go on, go on over,
go on there, go on over there

CJ
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CalifJim "on" adds encouragement. "over" emphasizes the trajectory. "here" or "there" emphasizes the destination. "come" and "go" are hardly ever used 'bare' compared to all the other variants.

Is there any other expression you can come up with where 'on' is added to imply encouragement?
No other expressions come to mind immediately.

Maybe, "Move on!" (police speaking to members of a crowd gawking at an accident, for example.)
Maybe, "Run on ahead (and see ...).

In other expressions, "on" seems to convey the idea of continuation of a process already in progress, possibly mixed with encouragement.

Get on with it.
Drive on.
Rave on!
Read on.
Carry on.
Play on.

Possibly:
Hold on.

CJ
CalifJimNo other expressions come to mind immediately.

Maybe, "Move on!" (police speaking to members of a crowd gawking at an accident, for example.)


I thought 'on' in 'move on' or 'go on' implied contiuation.
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That, too, of course.
Also "bring it on!"

Could the "encouragement" and "continuation" be the same thing?

Cf. "dream on!" – an ironic encouragement that you continue to dream.

MrP
Come on, MrP! What are you thinking? Emotion: smile

In "Come on" above, what is it that I am asking you to continue? On the contrary, the expression almost seems to beg you to cease and desist in directing your thoughts in that direction, don't you think? In fact, it's almost synonymous with "Come off it".

The header quote is only illustrative. Don't think I am truly expressing its content, because I don't really believe I disagree. The possibility of establishing some sort of a relationship between encouragement and continuation did occur to me earlier in the thread, but I had difficulty applying it uniformly for all the ways we use "on".
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