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Washington Post
"Pickups line the highway as the townsfolk come on over to observe Ray round off the pitcher's mound, pour the lines of lime, mount floodlights and bleachers."

In dictionaries, I could find "come on" and "come over to", but not "come on over to". What does "come on over to" mean?
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Comments  
It is a reasonably common grouping of adverbs; all those particles add a note of casualness:

...come on ('on' is encouragement) over (indicating a distance) to (short form of 'in order to') observe...
"Come on" is used as encouragement by a first-person to a second-person. The article is written in a third-person voice.
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No, it is fine in narrative as here in 3rd person.
"He came on over to his friend's house for dinner."

"He came over to his friend's house for dinner."

The second sentence is indisputably correct. Would the first one be okay?
How do you know that the 2nd is indisputably correct? Both are OK, as are 'He came to' and 'He came around to'. Context will decide the most 'correct'.
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Some Book
"She came on over to the pier and walked out to the end, kicked off her shoes, pulled Raymond's shirt off a post without even asking, and sat down on it to shield her legs from the blistering boards."

In this example, there does not seem to be any element of encouragement....
From that brief excerpt, I suspect that Raymond (or the narrator) found her action encouraging.
Here is the expanded:

"Raymond decided to spend Sunday night with his grandmother, but when he came back Monday, I wend over to his house to see if he wanted to go swmming or fish. He did,, so I spent most of the morning over there. About an hour or so before lunch, Marcie walked out of the path through the woods from Raymond's house and into the clearing around the pond. She came on over to the pier and walked out to the end, kicked off her shoes, pulled Raymond's shirt off a post without even asking, and sat down on it to shield her legs from the blistering boards."

Still encouraging?
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