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I'm waiting for someone to come out from that building.
I'm waiting for someone to come out of that building.

1. Suppose I'm waiting outside across the street, which of the above sentences is correct to say?
2. Is there any difference between them?
3. Also, which is natural?

Please advise. Thank you.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Yes I think this is a UK / US difference.

For me "in to" and "out of" are opposites so you go in to a building and you come out of a building. Out of as a preposition means no longer in.

When you are saying "Come out here" then the person you are talking to is not "in" here, so you would not say "out of".

Come out of the building and come here. (to where I am).
However if both people are in a place you can say "let's get out of here".

Imagine also a mother seeing her children in a room they are not supposed to be in. She enters the room, sees the children and say :-

Come on you two, out of here, you know you are not supposed to be here.
AnonymousAlso, I think the preposition 'of' in "come out of that building" and "come out of the door" is always required if I understood correctly CJ's response to my first post. Would you agree?
I agree.
Thank you, Louise, for your reponse and for that clarification. That was really helpful.
LouiseTCome on you two, out of here, you know you are not supposed to be here.
Just a question, is "out of here" in the example above just short for "get out of here"? If so, it can also be rewritten as follows:

Come on you two, (get) out of here, you know you are not supposed to be here.
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Yes. It could be "get out of here".
Okay, thank you for your help. I really appreciate it.