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I'm waiting for someone to come out from that building.
I'm waiting for someone to come out of that building.

1. Suppose I'm waiting outside across the street, which of the above sentences is correct to say?
2. Is there any difference between them?
3. Also, which is natural?

Please advise. Thank you.
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Comments  
I always say to come out of that building. Still, I don't see anything particularly objectionable about to come out from that building. It sounds a little strange to my ear, but I don't see anything ungrammatical about it. The meaning is the same either way.

CJ
Thank you very much for the answers.

Another question, if I may ask, which of the sentences below is correct?
If both are reasonable, what is the difference?
Which is more likely said by a native speaker?

I'm waiting for someone at the building to come out there.
I'm waiting for someone in the building to come out there.
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Anonymouswhich of the sentences below is correct?
If both are reasonable, what is the difference?
Which is more likely said by a native speaker?

I'm waiting for someone at the building to come out there.
I'm waiting for someone in the building to come out there.
There? Someone in the building would come out here, or just come out (no here, no there).

If a person is going to come out, he must be inside, so you're waiting for someone in the building to come out. Someone at the building would likely be waiting outside the building, so there would be no need for him to come out; he's already out.

CJ
Thank you for that explanation. It makes sense to me now.
CalifJimThere? Someone in the building would come out here, or just come out (no here, no there).
Is it not reasonable to use 'there' supposing I'm talking to someone at a place far from the building?

I'm waiting for someone in the building to come out there. (pointing at the door of the building)
AnonymousI'm waiting for someone in the building to come out there. (pointing at the door of the building)
Ah, yes. OK. (But you didn't provide a photo of yourself pointing at the door! Emotion: smile )

CJ
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So in that case, "come out there" is fine. Thank you for that clarification.

Sorry if I didn't give a clear picture of myself when uttering the example sentence.

Again, thank you for your kind assistance. Emotion: smile
If you are pointing at the building then I would say:-

I am waiting for someone to come out of there. / out of that building.
........to come out of the door

Note that this is how I would say it. Some people leave out the preposition

They are coming out of the building there. ( At that particular spot that I am pointing to.)
Thank you, Louise, for sharing your thoughts on this.
LouiseTI am waiting for someone to come out of there. / out of that building.
..to come out of the door

Note that this is how I would say it. Some people leave out the preposition
Do you think this is one of the differences between American English (...to come out there) and British English (...to come out of there)?

Nevertheless, I think "to come out here" is always correct, but never "to come of here". Would you agree?

Also, I think the preposition 'of' in "come out of that building" and "come out of the door" is always required if I understood correctly CJ's response to my first post. Would you agree?
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