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I attended the interview yesterday and Mr. Tom took interview to me. I gave all answers correctly, but still he rejected me. Actually, he came over quite arrogant from the outset.

Yesterday I didn't get off till 3 o'clock. As a result, now coming over a bit faint.

Are these sentences correct?

Please help me.
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I attended the interview yesterday and Mr. Tom took interviewed to me. I gave all answers correctly, but still he rejected me. Actually, he came over quite arrogantly from the outset.

Yesterday I didn't get off till 3 o'clock. As a result, I'm now coming over a bit faint.
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Nona The BritI attended the interview yesterday and Mr. Tom took interviewed to me. I gave all answers correctly, but still he rejected me. Actually, he came over quite arrogantly from the outset.

Yesterday I didn't get off till 3 o'clock. As a result, I'm now coming over a bit faint.

Hi, Nona. I think that we could use either the adjective or the adverb in this case.

He came over (walked across the room) quite arrogantly. ~ He came over (seemed) quite arrogant. Would you agree?
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No, I don't like 'He came over quite arrogant.' But 'He came over as quite arrogant' is ok by me. Or 'He came across as quite arrogant'. I'm also ok with using 'He came over arrogantly' to mean his attitude rather than a physical movement. That seems more likely in this context.
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Nona The BritNo, I don't like 'He came over quite arrogant.' But 'He came over as quite arrogant' is ok by me. Or 'He came across as quite arrogant'. I'm also ok with using 'He came over arrogantly' to mean his attitude rather than a physical movement. That seems more likely in this context.
Good point. .