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We met him at the Waukegan Regional Airport not far from his home. CNN producer Dana Garrett and I had flown there in my small, single-engine airplane, a Cirrus SR22. Within moments, Wayne and I were talking about the kind of mileage it gets.

Fortunately, as air travel goes, it is a pretty efficient mode of conveyance. Once I have leveled off at say 8,000 feet and after, I have "leaned" the fuel/air mixture to the most efficient setting. I usually get about 13 miles per gallon.

Wayne seemed to approve of this and was glad I did not arrive alone. He reminded me miles per gallon per person, or MPGPP, is really the crucial number. That led us to a conversation about the relative benefits of driving versus flying commercially.

I know the meaning may not be the same. Can I change "arive' to "come"? Or should it be "go"? "come" and "go" is kind of confusing to me. If a person approaches me, I would use 'come'. If I approach someone, I tend to say 'go' but I've heard 'come' and that really confuses me.

Thanks in advance.
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Here, arrive = come. It is from the 'speaker's' (here, Wayne's) viewpoint. Travel toward the speaker (and listener, if the listener is in the same place) is coming. However, if the listener is elsewhere, the movement may be viewed and stated for politeness' sake from the listener's perspective: (a phone call) Can I come to your house tomorrow?
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My take on the 1st para

We met him at the not far from his home. CNN producer Dana Garrett and I had flown to my small, in a single-engine airplane, a Cirrus SR22. Within moments, Wayne and I were talking about the kind of mileage it delivers.
Hope it helps
Thanks, MM.

Creativeguru, thanks for trying to help. I'm afriad that's not my question. If you look at the bottom of my post, the question is about 'come' vs 'go'. For what it's worth, your corrections to the prepositions may not be correct, I think. I agree with the original.