I keep hearing the phrase "Wanna come with?" without the object (as in "come along") although I can't remember ever hearing or seeing that in English class or among native English speakers at all. One place it's used in a lot is on the series "Entourage", so my suspicion is that it may be a more recent colloquialism, maybe some kind of, like, Valley English or even a Germanism/Frenchism, as it does sound like a clumsy literal translation. ("Kommst du mit?"/"Tu viens avec?" are both perfectly usable phrases in German and French.)
Can any of you give their diachronic perspective on this? Have I just ignored it this far, or is it a recent creation that is becoming more popular?
Cheers,
Luca

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I keep hearing the phrase "Wanna come with?" without the object (as in "come along") although I can't remember ever ... on this? Have I just ignored it this far, or is it a recent creation that is becoming more popular?

I have only a synchronic approach. I think we've covered this but there are only blunt tools for searching Google Deja so chapeau to anyone who finds it.
And I think our conclusion was that it developed from Yiddish and was found among Jewish people in the USA before being taken on by a wider community.
John Dean
Oxford
I keep hearing the phrase "Wanna come with?" without the object (as in "come along") although I can't remember ever ... on this? Have I just ignored it this far, or is it a recent creation that is becoming more popular?

It seems to me that I first heard it about 15-20 years ago. It still sounds wrong.
Bill in Kentucky
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I keep hearing the phrase "Wanna come with?" without the ... avec?" are both perfectly usable phrases in German and French.)

It was common in Chicago in the mid-60s when I got there and probably a long time before that. It may be spreading.
Can any of you give their diachronic perspective on this? Have I just

I don't even know what diatomic means. Emotion: smile
ignored it this far, or is it a recent creation that is becoming more popular?

I have only a synchronic approach. I think we've covered this but there are only blunt tools for searching Google ... developed from Yiddish and was found among Jewish people in the USA before being taken on by a wider community.

I don't think I was here for that discussion. The phrase In Yiddish doesn't ring a bell for me with or without an object, although I tend to think I would have noticed it had I heard it without an object. It was very noticeable in English when I got to Chicago at age 17, and I don't think it would have been if I had known it from Yiddish.

I haven't heard it among Jews at all, that I can recall, except possibly Jews in Chicago. I'll send a copy of this to a Jewish friend from Chicago, and maybe he can give me/us some backhground.
Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
My ex, the product of two Chicago-area Jewish families, definitely used it and I've picked it up from him. I do remember once using it and the person I said it so said "Oh, are you from Chicago?" Maybe that's all coincidence though. Personally, I like regional variation. Keeps things interesting. (I come from the New York "stand on line" tradition.)
I'm in London and a jewish colleague of mine has been using it for at least three years.
It sounded at first to me like an Americanism. Normally I dislike them, but this one I thought was okay.
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In Bill McCray (Email Removed) posted on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 19:50:13 -0400 the following:
I keep hearing the phrase "Wanna come with?" Can any ... is it a recent creation that is becoming more popular?

It seems to me that I first heard it about 15-20 years ago. It still sounds wrong.

I think people are just trying to be cute. It doesn't bother me to hear it. To me, it comes across as something currently being said by lots of teenie-boppers who want to go places and want their friends to come with.

Damaeus

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I'm in London and a jewish colleague of mine has been using it for at least three years.

Ask him if he's from Chicago.
It sounded at first to me like an Americanism. Normally I dislike them, but this one I thought was okay.

I know what you mean. The object of this preposition is usually clear even when not given.
"We're going to the park. Do you want to come with?"
Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
I keep hearing the phrase "Wanna come with?" without the object (as in "come along") although I can't remember ever ... on this? Have I just ignored it this far, or is it a recent creation that is becoming more popular?

I have heard this since my early teens (late 1940s, I think), and associate it with people raised where there are many 2nd generation German-Americans. My cousins in Milwaukee used it, but I think I heard it in Western Wisconsin.
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