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I went to the restaurant. And I say " It is the first time coming here."
" It is the first time to come here."
I learned that to+verb, verb+ing both act as a noun for It, so I am confused with when to use to or ing with verb. In the situation above, what is the right way to say? and what is the meaning of one of the sentences I made not fitting to this situation.
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Hi,
I went to the restaurant. And I say " It is the first time coming here."
" It is the first time to come here."
I learned that to+verb, verb+ing both act as a noun for It, so I am confused with when to use to or ing with verb. In the situation above, what is the right way to say? and what is the meaning of one of the sentences I made not fitting to this situation.

With this type of structure, this is what you would say.
This is my first time coming here.

For someone else, you would say
eg This is Tom's first time coming here.

Best wishes, Clive
Eunjinny:
In deciding whether to use the infinitive or gerund following another verb, please read this helpful article.
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Thanks.
It is my first time coming here.
This is the first time coming here.
This is the first time that I come here.
This is my first time in coming here.
(me talking) Are these sentences appropriate?
Hi Eunjinny

My comments are in blue:

It is my first time coming here. OK, but probably more common with "this" instead of "it".
This is the first time coming here. No, the word "the" is a problem.
This is the first time that I come here. I would prefer the present perfect: "...that I have come here."
This is my first time in coming here. I would not use the word "in" in this sentence.
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Hi,
I know you are trying to learn about the word 'coming'.

However, you might note that more commonly said, in this context, might be 'This is my first time here'.

Best wishes, Clive