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A sentence beginning with a dependent clause usually requires a comma after the clause:

'If you wish to see a movie, let's leave now.'

When we begin with a dependent clause after a coordinating conjunction, do we use a comma at the beginning and end of the dependent clause to set it off as a dependent clause?

'I have finished lunch, and, if you wish to see a movie, let's leave now.'

Or do we just use one at the end of the dependent clause:

'I have finished lunch, and if you wish to see a movie, let's leave now.'

There would, of course, be no problem if the sentence read:

'I have finished lunch, and let's leave now if you wish to see a movie.'
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Your posted question: 'I have finished lunch, and let's leave now if you wish to see a movie.'

I think the sentence is made to be more complicated than need be.

I would just put a period instead of a comma after {lunch} and eliminate the article{and}.

The whole sentence will be:

'I have finished lunch. Let's leave now if you wish to see a movie.'

Or 'I have finished lunch. If you wish to see a movie, let's leave now.'

The red and blue segments can be expressed with an inversion when the construct is involved with an “if” clause.
"I have finished lunch, and if you wish to see a movie, let's leave now." I'll choose this one.

paco
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Thanks, Paco.

So, essentially, we do not require a comma after the coordinating conjunction even if the following clause is dependent. Have I got it right?

I am going to the movies, and if you wish to join me, meet me at the cinema.

What I really want to know is whether this is an option or the correct option.

Would it be wrong to bung in a comma after the coordinating conjunction in this case?

Best,

S
Thanks, Paco.

So, essentially, we do not require a comma after the coordinating conjunction even if the following clause is dependent. Have I got it right?

I am going to the movies, and if you wish to join me, meet me at the cinema.

What I really want to know is whether this is an option or the correct option.

Would it be wrong to bung in a comma after the coordinating conjunction in this case?

Best,

S
I am going to the movies, and if you wish to join me meet me at the cinema. ( no need comma )

with the comma, you create nonrestrcitve clause. i think " if you wish to join me " is essentianl to the sentence.
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Where are you, Paco? Emotion: smile
Hi guys,

I am going to the movies, and if you wish to join me meet me at the cinema.

This is not a natural sentence. If you eliminate the subordinate clause, you get

I am going to the movies, and meet me at the cinema. This joining of an indicative and an imperative with 'and' is odd, to say the least. I'd strongly recommend replacing 'and' with 'so'.

Punctuation is certainly a lesser problem in such a sentence. However, if you want to improve the punctuation in the sentence as given, I would suggest

I am going to the movies and, if you wish to join me, meet me at the cinema.

Best wishes, Clive
Everyone seems to be missing the point ... or the comma in this case. Paco, where are you?
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