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Would it be grammatically incorrect to use a comma after a dash? Here is an example:

"If you are looking for someone who is willing to take on the challeges to overcome obstacles — in order to provide top-notch client satisfaction —, then I believe that she has what it takes to do just that. "

In this case, the phrase " in order to provide top-notch client satisfaction" was separated with dashes within the sentence because it is an "abrupt interruption".

Now the reason for having the comma, after the abrupt interruptional phrase, is because the phrase "If you are looking for someone who is willing to take on the challeges to overcome obstacles" is an introductory phrase.

Any clarifications and/or corrections would be greatly appreciated.
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Hello FBNP, and welcome to the forums.

No, this is very awkward.

But I also don't believe your dashes belong there either. It is not an abrupt interruption, but makes perfect sense within the flow of the setence, and neither is it parenthetical information. So remove the dashes and keep the comma.

You could also write this: "If you are looking for someone who will provide top-notch client satisfaction by taking on all challeges to overcoming obstacles, then that she has what it takes to do just that. "

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I thought the comma after the dash looked funny. Emotion: smile

Thanks a bunch GG! I appreaciate your contribution.

So is it incorrect to use a comma after a dash in any case (excluding the example that I had provided)?
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I hate to say "never" and "always," but I can't think of a single example in which a comma after a dash is the right way to go.
Grammar Geek
You could also write this: "If you are looking for someone who will provide top-notch client satisfaction by taking on all challeges to overcoming obstacles, then she has what it takes to do just that. "
I forgot to mention that the reason as to why the "I believe" part was included was because in that statement, the commentor (I myself Emotion: smile) did not want to make a bold claim about the said person ("she") — in case "she" ends up as a major failure. (I guess I could say that I don't want to be too confident in making a claim, yet I would like to persuade the reader to suggest that I was making a confident claim. In other words, if I were to use the phrase "I believe" in that sentence, and then if "she" were to end up as a total failure, the reader — to whom the statement is addressed — cannot later on claim that my comment about "her" was wrong, since it was only my belief.)
Grammar GeekYou could also write this: "If you are looking for someone who will provide top-notch client satisfaction by taking on all challeges to overcoming obstacles, then that she has what it takes to do just that. "
You did mean to write "overcome" instead of "overcoming", right? I could be wrong, as I am not sure if "overcoming" would be the correct tense. Afterall, I am "NO PRO". Emotion: smile
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A reply from GG or anyone else would be appreciated. Thanks.
Oh yes, you're completely correct. I was going to say "and overcoming" but changed my mind - apparently my finger kept on going with my original thought.

You could say "in my experience" instead of "I believe," maybe?
Here is an example:

"Having received the attention of five forums and no less than twenty judges - consider the enormity of the thought -, the judgment in Smith v Smith promised to be a testament to the legal engine and rule of law."

Is it not a question of style (as opposed to grammatical correctness)?
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