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Normally I get angry at those kids who cheat on tests, quizzes, essays, projects, etc. because I feel that when they do so it is out of disregard and neglect of everyone else's hard work and effort, as well as the teacher's trust and intention.
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I feel that no comma is required after etc.
Greatmilinko8451Normally I get angry at those kids who cheat on tests, quizzes, essays, projects etc., because I feel that when they do so it is out of disregard and neglect of everyone else's hard work and effort, as well as the teacher's trust and intention.
"etcetera" = "and the rest", so you treat it in the same was as saying "and the rest" or "and so on". No comma after projects and a comma after etc.
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This may be another American/British difference, but a comma always comes before etc. in AE.

(See Strunk & White, for example.)
Grammar GeekThis may be another American/British difference, but a comma always comes before etc. in AE.

(See Strunk & White, for example.)

In British English, a comma also comes before etc.
Thanks! That's what I thought.
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There should be a comma before and after "etc." in midsentence because that word or abbreviation is considered parenthetical, equivalent to "and others," "and so on," "and the like," etc.
In English usage, at least, we have the option to insert a comma before the 'and' in a list without the 'etc.'. As in 'apples, pears, and plums'. This is called the "Oxford comma". Usually it is only inserted to avoid confusion in a compound list: steak and kidney, rhubarb and custard, and cheese and biscuits. The 'etc.' rules seem to follow the Oxford comma usage, which is why the analogy with 'and the rest' does not apply.
The oxford comma is usually omitted in BrE because a listing comma already represents 'and' or 'or'. 'He likes apples and oranges and grapes' becomes 'He likes apples, oranges and grapes' -- among a few other reasons. 'Etc.' has nothing to do with this. Specifically, as quoted from wikipedia:

"... it is customary—even in British English where the serial comma is typically not used—that "etc." always be preceded by a comma. Thus:

A, B, C, etc.

not:

A, B, C etc "

I would even use a comma (in BrE) before 'and so on'. He likes apples, oranges, pears, and so on. He does not also like 'so on'.
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