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A coma question!

I've found that American based writers use commas after 'i.e.', but what of it in British English and does it then apply to eg. as well?
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Hi,

Let's let someone who currently lives in Britain respond about the comma..

However, if you want to write carefully, write not only i.e. but also e.g. Both are abbreviations of two words, and thus need two periods.

Best wishes, Clive
JaCKo__007A coma question!

I've found that American based writers use commas after 'i.e.', but what of it in British English and does it then apply to eg. as well?

Does a comma go after i.e. or e.g.?

Both abbreviations i.e. and e.g. are preceded by a mark of punctuation, usually a comma. In American English, both are generally followed by a comma, though not in British English, and are not italicized. E.g. may also be followed by a colon, depending on the construction. In British English, the term is often written as eg with the periods omitted.
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Thanks guys, thats great. Emotion: big smile

Had no idea the periods were omitted!
Is that correct?

I think that a semi colon can precede "e.g." but not follow it.

Is the claim about British English true?

I do know that in U.S. English, one should usually write "; e.g.," or ", e.g.,". The same thing applies to "i.e.", "that is", "for example" etc.
yes. The abbreviation i.e. means 'that is' with which the sentence is not complete and a pause is there. Hence a comma is required here.
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To be clear, the comma is NOT used in British English.

The original response is correct, and is ratified by a number of sources including the OED and Dictionary.com.
So would the ommision of the full stops in British English apply to 'i.e.' as well? So that it would be 'ie' as opposed to 'i.e.'?
Would the omission of full stops for 'eg' in British English apply to 'i.e.' as well? So that it would be 'ie' and not 'i.e.'?
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