+0
He also had the support of the crowd, with his hometown of Philadelphia being just up the road.

Note the comma before WITH. I never know when to use a comma before with and when not. Can anyone explain the difference?
Comments  
Hi Pambele,

Welcome to the Forum.

He also had the support of the crowd, with his hometown of Philadelphia being just up the road.

Note the comma before WITH. I never know when to use a comma before with and when not. Can anyone explain the difference?

It depends on how 'tightly coupled' the will phrase is to what precedes it. In other words, it depends on how important the phrase is to the overall meaning of the sentence.

eg He surprised her with an engagement ring. He surprised her, with an umbrella in his hand.

eg He fell with a dozen eggs in his hand, but none of the eggs broke. He fell, with a book in his hand.

Another way to look at this is to consider that a comma represents a pause in speaking. So, put a comma if you feel that you would pause. However, I realize that this can sometimes be difficult for learners to judge.

Finally, there are cases where the same sentence may or may not use a comma, depending on the meaning you wish to convey.

eg He went to the movies with Mary. This sounds like they were on a date. Mary is an important part of the 'sentence-story'.

eg He went to the movies, with Mary. This sounds like he went because he wanted to see the movie. Mary just happened to accompany him.

Best wishes, Clive
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_clause.html
this explained it better for me.

haha wow you can post anonymously!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
That has nothing to do with comma before with questions.
Hello Experts,

So anytime there is a comma after with some information, it's a non essential modifier?

Thank you

Newbie
Hi. I think you have a typo:
It depends on how 'tightly coupled' the will phrase is ...

should be:
It depends on how 'tightly coupled' the with phrase is ...

Bev
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Pambelewith his hometown of Philadelphia being just up the road.
Just to note: "with ... being ..." participle clauses are stylistically very weak constructions. It's preferable in most cases to write a finite clause.

He also had the support of the crowd because his hometown of Philadelphia was just up the road.

CJ

Correct. The comma after with in this case is correct, as the subject is not 'in the company of' or 'in possession of' something or someone. In the op's sentence example, with is applied in place of 'because of', or 'owing to,' meaning that the reason that the subject had the support of the crowd is because of the fact, or is owing to the fact that his hometown of Philadelphia was nearby in location, implying that many of the local fans came out to cheer him on. A comma is not required after with when with is applied to show the company of more than one subject ex: Jack knew he wanted to go with Sandy to the beach to watch gulls mating.