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Sir,

The orchestra rehearses on Tuesday, but the chorus rehearses on Wednesday.

There is a comma before the word "but".Sometimes it is not used. this is a very confusing.

Can you please clear it,when should I use comma and when no comma.

Thanks.
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If the group of words following the but is independent (it can stand as a complete sentence), the comma is used.

I went out yesterday, but I got lost.
I went out yesterday but got lost.
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Re: Somtimes [a comma] is not used.

It's often the case that a writer will leave out the comma if s/he feels the coordinating conjunction is adequate separation, especially if it's a sentence with "short, balanced independent clauses (such as we see in the example just given). If there is ever any doubt, however, use the comma, as it is always correct in this situation."

Source: www.ccc.commnet.ed
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nicely said. Thank you.
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Hi,

Think about how you would say this aloud to someone.

Use a comma if you would want to pause before 'but'.

If you wouldn't pause, don't use a comma.

Clive
Casi If there is ever any doubt, however, use the comma, as it is always correct in this situation."

Isn't it:

If there is ever any doubt; however, use the comma, as it is always correct in this situation."
AnonymousIf there is ever any doubt; however, use the comma, as it is always correct in this situation."
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Haha That is not the correct usage. In this case, the "however" is an interjection and does not link two independent clauses.

If there is any doubt, however, use the comma, as it is always correct.

or
You may have some doubts; however, the comma is always correct.
I can't take the advice of someone who doesn't know correct punctuation. The comma goes inside the quote, not outside.
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