Can someone please correct me in the following example (which is correct)?

"or in some cases the solution is..." OR "or, in some cases, the solution is..."

I tend to overuse my comma, and am unsure what is proper (or necessary) for today's writing.

Thanks.
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[nq:1]Can someone please correct me in the following example (which is correct)? "or in some cases the solution is..." OR "or, in some cases, the solution is..." I tend to overuse my comma, and am unsure what is proper (or necessary) for today's writing. Thanks.
The fragment is OK either way to me. However, you should post the full sentence.

One thing I have learned about English is that context is everything.

Izzy
I agree with Izzy that either formation is probably fine (and that the context may affect that answer).

However, the phrase "I tend to overuse my comma" implies that you've only got the one, in which case you may want to save it for a rainy day.

regards -Laura
Can someone please correct me in the following example (which ... unsure what is proper (or necessary) for today's writing. Thanks.

The fragment is OK either way to me. However, you should post the full sentence. One thing I have learned about English is that context is everything. Izzy[/nq]
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[nq:1]I agree with Izzy that either formation is probably fine (and thatthe context may affect that answer). However, the phrase ... implies thatyou've only got the one, in which case you may want to save it for a rainyday. regards -Laura
In an emergency he could use half a semi-colon.

Izzy

(BTW, why do you top-post? OE?
The fragment is OK either way to me. However, ... have learned about English is that context is everything. Izzy[/nq]
[nq:1]Can someone please correct me in the following example (which is correct)? "or in some cases the solution is..." OR "or, in some cases, the solution is..." I tend to overuse my comma, and am unsure what is proper (or necessary) for today's writing. Thanks.
Some style guides tell you never to put a comma after "and", "or", or "but". I generally go along. As Izzy mentioned, the answer depends on the whole sentence, but in this case I'd go for, well, I guess it's obvious. Another option is "or in some cases, the solution is...".

A comma after an introductory phrase such as "in some cases" is pretty optional. Ask yourself whether it makes anything any clearer. If not, ask yourself whether you want readers to pause there. And keep in mind that some people, for reasons I've never understood, dislike punctuation and want you to minimize it. (Well, I understand why James Thurber disliked it--he had very bad vision and those hard-to-make-out marks bothered him.)

-- Jerry Friedman
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Maybe she uses the Feynman comma.

-- -- Richard Maurer To reply, remove half Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also. -- Now, as for the actual curly of the matter, I'll pass now.
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[nq:2]Can someone please correct me in the following example (which ... unsure what is proper (or necessary) for today's writing. Thanks.
Some style guides tell you never to put a comma after "and", "or", or "but". I generally go along. I doubt any style guides even considered that you'd want to do that.[/nq]
[nq:1]I agree with Izzy that either formation is probably fine (and that the context may affect that answer). However, the ... you've only got the one, in which case you may want to save it for a rainy day. regards -Laura
I fully agree. It's his exclamation point he should save for special occasions -:)

John Ramsay

(Old enough to remember when the interjection was called something else -:))
The fragment is OK either way to me. However, ... have learned about English is that context is everything. Izzy[/nq]
[nq:2] Some style guides tell you never to put a comma after "and", "or", or "but". I generally go along.
I doubt any style guides even considered that you'd want to do that.

The people at say, "One of the most frequent errors in comma usage is the placement of a comma after_ a coordinating conjunction." (Emphasis theirs.) They also say, "When a parenthetical element — an interjection, adverbial modifier, or even an adverbial clause — follows a coordinating conjunction used to connect two independent clauses, we do _not_ put a comma in front of the parenthetical element. (snip examples) (This last piece of advice relies on the authority of William Strunk's _Elements of Style....)"

-- Jerry Friedman
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