In the sentence, "He walked with a fast, determined stride at first but much to Kettle's relief, soon slowed." it seems right that I should put a comma after 'but' because I am setting off the phrase 'much to Kettle's relief' ('...but, much to Kettle's relief,....'). However my MS Word suggested I should leave it out. I tried to find the specific rule that says I can (should?) do this but can not find it. Where am I going wrong? Thank you in advance.
1 2
AnonymousIn the sentence, "He walked with a fast, determined stride at first but much to Kettle's relief, soon slowed." it seems right that I should put a comma after 'but' because I am setting off the phrase 'much to Kettle's relief' ('...but, much to Kettle's relief,....').  However my MS Word suggested I should leave it out.  I tried to find the specific rule that says I can (should?) do this but can not find it.  Where am I going wrong?  Thank you in advance.

I agree with you. It is not wrong to put a comma after 'but'.
Actually, you only use a comma after a coordinating conjunction (but, and, or) if you are seperating two independent clauses. Since the second part of your sentence "but, much to Kettle's relief..." cannot stand alone as a sentence, it is not an independent clause and, you do not need a comma after but.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
AnonymousActually, you only use a comma after a coordinating conjunction (but, and, or) if you are seperating two independent clauses. Since the second part of your sentence "but, much to Kettle's relief..." cannot stand alone as a sentence, it is not an independent clause and, you do not need a comma after but.
You put a comma BEFORE a coordinating conjunction when it separates two independent clauses. The comma is needed here for exactly the reason gave two years ago -- the commas go on either side of "much to Kettle's relief" to set it off as a parenthetical comment.
I also have a question about the commas. Can you use commas after a complete sentence because sometimes even though you have made a complete sentence, you still have thoughts you want to say and you don't want to end your sentence yet with the period.

E.g. I have already told you (,/.?) you need to forget the past(,/.?) if you have health, you could reachieve everything and anything.

If I put all periods it seems I have too many sentences and all of them have the same thoughts or related.

E.g. I have already told you. You need to forget the past. If you have health,
you could reachieve everything and anything.
Jin_HI also have a question about the commas. Can you use commas after a complete sentence because sometimes even though you have made a complete sentence, you still have thoughts you want to say and you don't want to end your sentence yet with the period.

E.g. I have already told you (,/.?) you need to forget the past(,/.?) if you have health, you could reachieve everything and anything.

If I put all periods it seems I have too many sentences and all of them have the same thoughts or related.

E.g. I have already told you. You need to forget the past. If you have health, you could reachieve everything and anything.

Keep the first two together, because they are one thought. I have already told you [that] you need to forget the past. You can replace that "that" with the comma.

Did you mean "you can achieve everything..?"

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I meant reachieve, like achieve something again after you lost it. Did I wrote it wrong?

And also, when I say "Did I wrote it wrong" is it supposed to be wrote or write?
Jin_HI meant reachieve, like achieve something again after you lost it. Did I wrote it wrong? And also, when I say "Did I wrote it wrong" is it supposed to be wrote or write?
If "reachieve" is a word, it's one I have never seen or used. Recover, achieve again, perhaps even reattain.

Did I write it... When you have any form of the verb "to do" you use the main form of the main verb.

I wrote it -- I didn't write it.

He wrote it -- He he write it?
I had a similar problem with another post on another thread. I was giving examples of sentences that I came up with to see if I had any grammar mistakes. This is the link to the thread, it's the third post on the second page http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/AnOrA/2/pnznp/Post.htm#1318450 .

So does the same rule apply(s?) for "have" as well. I said in that post: I've randomly came up with these sentences, and it should be "come up".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more