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Is there a difference between the phrases "I love you, Baby" and I love you Baby"?

Does the use of the comma make a difference or make one phrase grammatically correct over the other?

Thanks!!
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MillerRIs there a difference between the phrases "I love you, Baby" and I love you Baby"?

Does the use of the comma make a difference or make one phrase grammatically correct over the other?

Thanks!!
Welcome to the boards, MillerR. (The comma doesn't change the meaning....it's just a convention.)
Comments  
"I love you, Baby" is grammatically correct, and "I love you Baby" is not. When you speak directly to someone and use their name or a term of endearment like "Baby", you always offset the name with a comma. Other examples:

"Hi, Mom!"

"Henry, get the mail."

"Excuse me, sir, but is that your car?"

I see people drop the comma all the time, especially on the internet. This is one of those rules that might be changing already. I know I've seen writers drop this comma in novels, usually to show differences in tone or personality within dialogue.
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 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.
Afternoon Miller R!

We generally don't capitalize terms of endearment, such as baby, dear, darling, or honey etcetera, but we do set them apart with commas, e.g.

"Don't worry, honey, I'll take care of it."

"What would you like, princess, a chocolate sundae or a strawberry one?".

Cheers - J.

P.S. This response tab isn't working , so I can't get rid of the excess period at the end of my second example sentence.
AnonymousWe generally don't capitalize terms of endearment, such as baby, dear, darling, or honey etcetera,

This seems strange to me. Either I just haven't noticed, or it's different south of our common border.
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Is this correct: I love you, my darling, and I cherish your friendship.

yes

I love you, most.


Is that correct?

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No.