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Hi. In a book named "Absolute Surrender" by Andrew Murray, published by Whitaker House, on page 19, there is this sentence:

Oh, we want to confess

the sins of God's people around us, and to humble ourselves.

Q: What is the reason for a comma?

In the said book, on page 20, there is this sentence:

But as we confess the state of the Church, and the feebleness and sinfulness of the work for God among us, let us come back to ourselves.

Q: What is the reason for a comma?

In the said book, on page 20, there is this sentence:

For the joy set before Him He endured the cross.

Q: Would you place a comma after the word "Him"?

How about this? What is the reason for a comma here?

The beauty of this book is that it possess the finest elements of best-selling books, but with an compromising Gospel message.
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Hi,

Very generally speaking, commas in longer sentences help the reader's understanding by identifying their different parts. In spoken English, obviously there are no commas, but the speaker will usually pause. That's what a comma represents, a brief pause.



In shorter written sentences, a comma sometimes adds the emphasis that a pause in speaking would add.

When you consider your specific queries in the light of these comments, do you need further help? If so, please post again.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi. Thank you for taking time to answer my questions.

I wrote:

In the said book, on page 20, there is this sentence:

But as we confess the state of the Church, and the feebleness and sinfulness of the work for God among us, let us come back to ourselves.

Q: What is the reason for a comma?

If I were to write the above sentence, I would be hard pressed (?) to know where to place a comma, after the word "Church" or after the word "feebleness." How should one decide? Am I not seeing something obvious? If it is, what is that? Thank you again for your anticipated help.
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Hi again,

Thank you for taking time to answer my questions. You're welcome.

I wrote:

In the said book, on page 20, there is this sentence:

But as we confess the state of the Church, and the feebleness and sinfulness of the work for God among us, let us come back to ourselves.

Q: What is the reason for a comma?

If I were to write the above sentence, I would be hard pressed (?) to know where to place a comma, after the word "Church" or after the word "feebleness." How should one decide? Am I not seeing something obvious? If it is, what is that?

Let's use brackets to see more vividly the writer's intended meaning.

But as we confess (the state of the Church) and (the feebleness and sinfulness of the work for God among us) let us come back to ourselves.

The writer appears to be viewing 'feebleness and sinfulness' as a pair of closely related qualities ( like 'fish and chips'). Semantically, that seems to me to make sense.

Now let's try it with the comma after 'Church' moved to follow 'feebleness'.

But as we confess the state of the Church and the feebleness, and sinfulness of the work for God among us, let us come back to ourselves.

But as we confess (the state of the Church) and (the feebleness) and (sinfulness of the work for God among us) let us come back to ourselves.

'Feebleness' is now severed from the modifier 'of the work for God among us', so that the reader has to ask himself "What feebleness does the writer mean?"

In other words, as you can see, the meaning is different. To me, it makes less sense. What do you think?

Best wishes, Clive



Hi. You seem to have provided a clear explanation to the dilemma and I am thankful for it. Your explanation seems to leave nothing to doubt -- a very clear explanation. Thank you.
Hi. Please help. Do you think the comma is needed in the place indicated (before the word "lived")?

Some of the people who didn't get up to go to work on that day due to the still small voice which warned them not to go, lived.
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Hi,

Please help. Do you think the comma is needed in the place indicated (before the word "lived")?

Some of the people, who didn't get up to go to work on that day due to the still small voice which warned them not to go, lived.

Yes, and put one after 'people' as well.

You need to show that the part in commas refers to 'some of the people' and not just to 'people'.

But really, it would be clearer if you just reword the sentence.

eg Some people didn't get up to go to work on that day, due to the still small voice which warned them not to. They lived.

Clive
CliveYes, and put one after 'people' as well.You need to show that the part in commas refers to 'some of the people' and not just to 'people'.
I have just found this wonderful website, and thoroughly have enjoyed all your posts I've read so far. However, here is a suggestion I submit to you for your opinion.
Instead of putting a comma after the word 'people', I would place it after the word 'day' to read as follows:

Some of the people who didn't get up to go to work on that day, due to the still small voice which warned them not to go, lived.

I am curious to see what you think.

B.
Hi,
Both sentences ways are correct, but with different meanings.

Let's make assumptions.
There were 100 people.
40 of them got up to go work.

60 of them didn't get up to go to work due to the still small voice which warned them not to go.

Some of the people, who didn't get up to go to work on that day due to the still small voice which warned them not to go, lived. This sounds like it is talking about the 60.

Some of the people who didn't get up to go to work on that day, due to the still small voice which warned them not to go, lived. This sounds like it is talking about some, but not all, of the 60.

Clive
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