Gen Mladic, 69, was arrested in May and is awaiting trial in The Hague at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

He is accused over the massacre of about 7,500 people at Srebrenica - Europe's worst atrocity since World War II - as well as the 44-month siege of the Bosnian capital Sarajevo, in which 10,000 people died.

Earlier this week, Gen Mladic was treated in hospital after his lawyer said he was suffering from pneumonia.

He told the court last week he had suffered from a kidney stone, and his family say he had two strokes during his years on the run from the Hague tribunal.

In 2006, former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic died during the fourth year of his war crimes trial before a verdict could be reached.

After the Bosnian war, Milosevic protected Gen Mladic, who lived openly in Belgrade, attending football matches and going to restaurants.

But after Milosevic was arrested in 2001, Gen Mladic disappeared from view.

He was detained by Serbian intelligence officers in May, who found him living in a village north of the Serbian capital Belgrade.

A career soldier and a fervent nationalist, Gen Mladic inspired passionate devotion among his soldiers.

-------------------------------------------------

Look at those red-colored sentences.

He told the court last week he had suffered from a kidney stone. [ This is an independant clause; so it could stand alone.]

The rest of the sentence in question is connected with a comma. Why is it necessary?

He was detained by Serbian intelligence officers in May. [ This is an independant clause; so it could stand alone.]

The rest of the sentence in question is connected with a comma. Why is it necessary?
1 2
Hi,

Gen Mladic, 69, was arrested in May and is awaiting trial in The Hague at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

He is accused over the massacre of about 7,500 people at Srebrenica - Europe's worst atrocity since World War II - as well as the 44-month siege of the Bosnian capital Sarajevo, in which 10,000 people died.

Earlier this week, Gen Mladic was treated in hospital after his lawyer said he was suffering from pneumonia.

He told the court last week he had suffered from a kidney stone, and his family say he had two strokes during his years on the run from the Hague tribunal.

In 2006, former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic died during the fourth year of his war crimes trial before a verdict could be reached.

After the Bosnian war, Milosevic protected Gen Mladic, who lived openly in Belgrade, attending football matches and going to restaurants.

But after Milosevic was arrested in 2001, Gen Mladic disappeared from view.

He was detained by Serbian intelligence officers in May, who found him living in a village north of the Serbian capital Belgrade.

A career soldier and a fervent nationalist, Gen Mladic inspired passionate devotion among his soldiers.

--

Look at those red-colored sentences.

He told the court last week he had suffered from a kidney stone. [ This is an independant clause; so it could stand alone.]

The rest of the sentence in question is connected with a comma. Why is it necessary? It's not necessary, but the writer chose to put it there in orfder to encourage the reader to pause there and absorb the meaning of the first part of the sentence. This is easier to understand if you magine the writer saying this sentence, and pausing at that point.

If the two parts of the sentence were shorter, such a pause (or comma) would be less likely to be used, as it would be easier for the listener (reader) to absorb both parts of what is being said.

He was detained by Serbian intelligence officers in May. [ This is an independant clause; so it could stand alone.]

The rest of the sentence in question is connected with a comma. Why is it necessary? The comma (or pause in speech) is used to indicate that what follows is not essential information but is, instead, a parenthetical kind of afterthought.

In my comments, I've tried to relate commas to pauses, because I find that discussions about commas often seem to forget completely that commas are related to how we speak.

Clive
Thanks Clive

I understand your point. I thought you would tell me the existence of an adverbial clause.

There is no adverbial clause here. Am I correct?

In a recent post our friend AlpeccaStars taught me about adverbial clauses.

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/AComma/qwhdb/post.htm

These things are tough.

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I have a hunch that in the following the necessity of the comma arises; because of an adverbial clause.

A career soldier and a fervent nationalist, Gen Mladic inspired passionate devotion among his soldiers.
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I would like to hear from you again.

Will you classify it as an adverbial clause too?
Hi,

I have a hunch that in the following the necessity of the comma arises; because of an adverbial clause.

A career soldier and a fervent nationalist, Gen Mladic inspired passionate devotion among his soldiers.

There's nothing adverbial here. The underlined part is an appositive phrase that provides extra information about Gereral Mladic. You can see that this is so by simply deleting 'General Mladic'. The sentence still remains grammatical and has meaning.

ie A career soldier and a fervent nationalist inspired passionate devotion among his soldiers.

Appostives are commonly set off by a comma.

Clive
CliveAppositives are commonly set off by a comma.
Clive
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Hi,

Thanks for the correction. If you want to check all my posts for spelling errors, please go ahead. I try to avoid them, but I don't always succeed.

Clive
Hi,

I've made a correction here, but it doesn't mean I'm going to check all of your posts for any kind of errors.

You don't have to be sarcastic.

Regards
Hi,

It was intended only as light sarcasm, as it seemed a little nit-picky to me.

My apologies if I over-reacted.

Clive
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