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I was under the impression that we can't use a comma before 'if' for the following sentences:

- Please let me know if you need any further information.

- We will get wet if it rains.

When using Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary though, the following sentences were used when looking up 'would' and 'could'.

- I wouldn't worry about it, if I were you.

- We could go for a drink after work tomorrow, if you like.

Why is a comma used before 'if' in the would/could sentences, but not in the first two sentences?

Thanks!
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Comments  
You can use comma in if sentences if the 'if' clause comes first. If an independent clause follows a dependent clause then you can use a comma to separate it from the independent clause. "if' clause is usually a dependent clause.

Rule: If the dependent clause comes first, you should use a comma.

But in your example sentences the first clause appears incomplete. May be that is the reason a comma is used there.
Sooris
Rule: If the dependent clause comes first, you should use a comma.

But in your example sentences the first clause appears incomplete. May be that is the reason a comma is used there.

Thank you Sooris, but I am still confused.

I thought the first clause of these sentences are complete, independant clauses, aren't they?

- I wouldn't worry about it.

- We could go for a drink after work tomorrow.

So still, why is a comma used at the end of these sentences?

Thanks!
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Perhaps because the phrase "if I were you" is considered a free modifier and it can go anywhere in the sentnece. Ex. If I were you, I wouldn't worry about it./ I wouldn't worry about it, if I were you. When it doesn't cause confusion when moving the phrase then it is a free modifier and then comma use is necessary.
"If an independent clause follows a dependent clause then you can use a comma to separate it from the independent clause. "if' clause is usually a dependent clause." - Sooris

Sooris!!!! You forgot to follow your own instructions!!!!!

Should read:
"If an independent clause follows a dependent clause, [comma] then you can use a comma to separate it from the independent clause. "if' clause is usually a dependent clause."
A late comment, but still...

I think the important difference here is that in your first two examples, we are dealing with true conditional clauses. In the next two, however, the if is more a marker of politeness.

For example, you can´t use would in a conditional if-clause ("I could do it if you would help helped me."), but you can use it in a "polite if-clause" like "If you would be so kind as to help me".

Maybe the comma is another expression of that difference.
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Green Tea- I wouldn't worry about it, if I were you.- We could go for a drink after work tomorrow, if you like.
Another late comment. There is no good reason to use a comma in these sentences either. Personally, I would just stick to the usual rule and leave them out.

CJ
I think there are no concrete rules about using punctuation marks and all punctuation marks are to simplify reading and understanding the meaning of the writer. So I think we can use them anyhow except for the meaning is communicated incorrectly, or reading and understanding get more difficult.

i would not worry about it if i were you

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