Hello,

Many kind thanks who can answer the following questions:

1. Should there be a comma with 'and' in this sentence?:

As a juvenile, Thomas was involved in gangs and had prior convictions of theft and simple assault.

My thought is that it doesn't need a comma because it's part of a compound subject compliment/predicate. In general, my understanding is that it's important to determine if 'and' is used as part of a compound predicate (as above) or introduces a non-relative clause (e.g. There relationship was strong initially, and only grew as time progressed) when using a comma. Is this correct?

2. Also, when it comes to the conjunction 'or', my understanding is the same thing applies. For example, "Do you want apple or oranges?" versus "I want to re-build my house this year, or try to save money for a vacation." Is this correct?

3. When a quote is at the end of a sentence, where does the punctuation go? For example, "Everyone needs to get to work on time." versus "Everyone needs to get to work on time". What if you are referring to the title of something at the end of a sentece? For example, I love the movie "A Clockwork Orange". versus I love the movie "A Clockwork Orange."

Thank you so much for your time and assistance.
The usual problem with "and" after nouns is that the eye/brain expects another noun. I would use a comma to avoid this, but the sentence isn't "wrong" without it.
postmodernblissMy thought is that it doesn't need a comma because it's part of a compound subject compliment/predicate.
I agree with you.
postmodernbliss2. Also, when it comes to the conjunction 'or', my understanding is the same thing applies.
I agree with you. The coordinating conjunctions (FANBOYS) follow the same punctuation rules.
Here is a good reference on commas: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/commas.htm

postmodernbliss3. When a quote is at the end of a sentence, where does the punctuation go?
It depends on if you use American style or British style punctuation.
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/marks/quotation.htm