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Hi everybody,
I read a handout about using commas in English, but I´m still not sure in these 4 cases. Could you please help me? Thank you.

- You can find the famous Old Course there and the British Golf Museum, tracing the development of this royal game.

- When in crowded places, visitors should be aware of pickpockets.
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- You can find the famous Old Course there and the British Golf Museum tracing the development of this royal game.-- No comma; the clause defines the museum.
- When in crowded places, visitors should be aware of pickpockets.-- Yes, fronted adverbial clause takes a comma.


- Among his most renowned works of this genre, I should mention Waverly, Ivanhoe and Rob Roy. -- Yes, fronted adverbial phrase takes a comma. BrE would have a comma after 'Ivanhoe'.
- Soon, he established the first transatlantic television broadcast.-- Yes, fronted adverb takes a comma; however, with such a short and clear one, omission is permitted.
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Thank you so much!
And what if the first sentence would be modified: You can find the famous Old Course there and the British Golf Museum which traces the development of this royal game.
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If it is defining, do this:

You can find the famous Old Course there and the British Golf Museum that traces the development of this royal game.

If you wish it to be non-defining, I think you have to recast the sentence slightly:

You can find there the famous Old Course and the British Golf Museum, which traces the development of this royal game.

The placement of the adverb seems critical for some reason.
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