Hi folks,
I'm working on a list of most common mistakes made by Poles learning English and I would appreciate your comments and opinions, especially on the "incorrect" usage - or is it?
Thanks in advance!
/btw - very useful newsgroup, especially for non-native speakers!/

incorrect/correct

1. What can you see on the picture?/What can you see in the picture?
2. It was in TV, in the radio, in the internet./It was on TV, on theradio, on the internet.

3. It depends of him./It depends on him.
4. Pick up the phone and call to him./Pick up the phone and call him.
5. So, how to say “mistake” in English?/So, how should/can I say“mistake” in English?

6. I will come in Wednesday./I will come on Wednesday.
7. OK, I’ll be, see you!/OK, I’ll be there, see you!
8. Explain me how to do this./Explain to me how to do this.
9. You have right!/You are right!
10. You have thirty years./You are thirty years old.
1 2
Hi folks, I'm working on a list of most common mistakes made by Poles learning English and I would appreciate ... the phone and call him. 5. So, how to say "mistake" in English?/So, how should/can I say "mistake" in English?

It would be more idiomatic to say "So, how do you say 'mistake' in English?" A more formal version would be "So, how does one say 'mistake' in English."
Still, it's an odd sentence. If it were a question of the meaning of the word within quotes, one might find sentences such as "So, how do you say 'faute' in English?" (where "faute" is the French word for "mistake"). If it were a question of the pronunciation of the word the sentence being written rather than spoken I'd put it thus: "So, how do you pronounce 'mistake' in English?" (more formally, "So, how does one pronounce 'mistake' in English?")
6. I will come in Wednesday./I will come on Wednesday. 7. OK, I'll be, see you!/OK, I'll be there, see ... me how to do this. 9. You have right!/You are right! 10. You have thirty years./You are thirty years old.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
You may also find this interesting (although for other kind of mistakes): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-native pronunciations of English#Polish
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Hi folks, I'm working on a list of most common mistakes made by Poles learning English and I would appreciate ... me how to do this. 9. You have right!/You are right! 10. You have thirty years./You are thirty years old.

American English speakers would use the second choice in each case. (Pat US/Midwest)
In #6, I can see special cases in which "in Wednesday" might be used. Another option for both choices would be "in on".
Hi folks, I'm working on a list of most common mistakes made by Poles learning English and I would appreciate ... me how to do this. 9. You have right!/You are right! 10. You have thirty years./You are thirty years old.

6. You can also say, "I will come Wednesday." There is a verb phrase"to come in", used, for example, to mean "to come to work". In that sense, you might come across the version you listed as a mistake: (come in) (Wednesday) rather than (come) (in Wednesday). I realise that such details of idiom may be unneccessary for your students at this stage.
7. There is an expression of amazement, "I'll be! (damned)", that Ihad to get past to understand the student's meaning in this case. Note that, in answer to an order like "Be there on Wednesday," you could legitimately say "OK, I will be." The stress is on "will" and the contracted form is not an option.
I see that a number of the mistakes (3, 8, 9,and 10) take a form that would be correct in French. Is that because the Polish idiom corresponds to the French or because, given the cultural connections between the two countries, French is still seen in Poland as the model of a foreign language?
6. You can also say, "I will come Wednesday." There is a verbphrase "to come in", used, for example, to ... than (come) (in Wednesday). I realise that such details of idiom may be unneccessary for your students at this stage.

A good point. Note, though, that in British usage missing out the "on" before a day is generally considered at least vulgar, and possibly even a mistake. I know this shouldn't matter, but students should be aware of it and play safe.

Mike.
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I see that a number of the mistakes (3, 8, 9,and 10) take a form that would be correct in ... the cultural connections between the two countries, French is still seen in Poland as the model of a foreign language?

I don't speak French, so I can't comment on the correspondance between French and Polish idioms. Nevertheless, French is not seen as a model of a foreigh language, as it used to be many years ago, especially in aristocratic circles. I can't see many cultural connections with France nowadays. There is a slight influence of German in the west of Poland (mainly on vocabulary), of Russian in the far east (mainly in the accent) and English all over the place - in words such as "leasing", "marketing", "coaching" and such.
I see that a number of the mistakes (3, 8, ... seen in Poland as the model of a foreign language?

I don't speak French, so I can't comment on the correspondance between French and Polish idioms. Nevertheless, French is not ... (mainly in the accent) and English all over the place - in words such as "leasing", "marketing", "coaching" and such.

Yes, I should have said "historical cultural connections". Interesting to know that they no longer obtain. Thanks to both of you.
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