In another thread here, there was constant reference to the fact that certain words and phrases (usage of) were in common usage (or, words to that effect). There are many example of "common usage" of incorrect words and phrases. I'll try to point out two or three:
1) You are listening to a phone conversation between someone in theroom with you and a person, unknown to you, on the "other end". When your friend hangs up, you (or somebody) says "What did "they " want. Obviously, the question should have been "What did he, or she want?", but the usage of that disgraceful poor grammar is "common usage".
2) There is a TV commercial in the U.S., for an optical supplier, thatsays "In the future, everyone will protect their eyes with..." In the past, before "women's lib" the statement would have been "protect his eyes...". Now, we would say "protect his, or her eyes.." (I would think.)
3) The receptionist at your company answers the phone and the callerwants to speak with a salesman. The salesmen are all out making sales calls. She says "None are here right now." I would have said "none IS here right now".
There are many examples of this. They are mistakes made by TV network writers and newspaper writers/editors. They are heard every day. They are all "common usage". Because of this, I hate to hear someone say that if an incorrect grammar usage is made by "The Times, or The Examiner. etc., it must be "OK". As far as I can see, the media ARE "dumbing us down." Am I wrong on any of the above? All of the above? WTF is going on here? Is Feb-RU-ary really Feb-U-ary now? Why was it Feb-RU-ary when I was a child in the 40's and 50's?

"Common usage" means, to me, that when I say something using proper English, the average person is thinking that I can't speak the language.
Jack
(Texan removed from the language of my Kent ancestors since 1660)
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In another thread here, there was constant reference to the fact that certain words and phrases (usage of) were in ... out making sales calls. She says "None are here right now." I would have said "none IS here right now".

I feel your pain.

1 and 2 above are the same, the use of the plural to avoid the genderspecific pronoun. On my high school's PA system "whoever lost their jacket, please come to the office." I was certain it was a boy's jacket, it was an all boys school.
Some of this makes it into common usage, and I cringe as well. 'Irregardless' is becoming an accepted variant. What do you propose? How do we stop this?
A coworker (one with whom I work, not someone who orks cows) used the word supposably (sic) and I mentioned this to her in private. "If I ever used a word in public and mangled it up, I'd hope someone would bring it to my attention. I'd never embarrass you in public, so I'm saying this in private, you pronounce the word 'supposedly' as though it were 'supposably'. I just though it kind to bring this to your attention.

She responded with a sincere thank-you. But she is unique, and most people don't welcome that criticism.
JOE
"If I ever
used a word in public and mangled it up, I'd hope someone would bring it to my attention. I'd never ... your attention. She responded with a sincere thank-you. But she is unique, and most people don't welcome that criticism. JOE

A few sloppy (common) pronunciations:
Tempeture
Vetinarian
Probly
Comfterbul (this is the worst one, other than vetinarian)

As far as "coworker" is concerned, I saw a post once where the writer placed a hyphen in the word to avoid problems. She placed the hyphen between "cow" and "orker" accidentally.
Jack
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"If I ever

used a word in public and mangled it up, I'd ... is unique, and most people don't welcome that criticism. JOE

A few sloppy (common) pronunciations: Tempeture Vetinarian Probly Comfterbul (this is the worst one, other than vetinarian)

Others:
intermural (intramural)
crate (create)
nalasis (analysis)
terminable (interminable)
etc. The first syllable of many words that begin with vowels is being clipped.
"If I ever

used a word in public and mangled it up, I'd ... is unique, and most people don't welcome that criticism. JOE

A few sloppy (common) pronunciations: Tempeture Vetinarian Probly Comfterbul (this is the worst one, other than vetinarian) As far as ... writer placed a hyphen in the word to avoid problems. She placed the hyphen between "cow" and "orker" accidentally. Jack

Comfterbul is an accepted pronunciation of comfortable. My wife pronounces it com-for-TAH-bul, which I think is cute.
Comfterbul is an accepted pronunciation of comfortable. My wife pronounces it com-for-TAH-bul, which I think is cute.

My whole post is about "accepted" pronunciations. Common usage and common mispronunciation bring about "accepted" pronunciations. At some point in the future, real-a-tor and nu-cu-lar may turn up as accepted pronunciations.
Jack
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comfterbul is an accepted pronunciation of comfortable. My wife pronounces it com-for-TAH-bul, which I think is cute.

My whole post is about "accepted" pronunciations. Common usage and common mispronunciation bring about "accepted" pronunciations. At some point in the future, real-a-tor and nu-cu-lar may turn up as accepted pronunciations. Jack

Indeed, to my horror, nuke-U-lar is accepted.
Homer Simpson has done this to us.
Comfterbul is an accepted pronunciation of comfortable. My wife pronounces it com-for-TAH-bul, which I think is cute.

My whole post is about "accepted" pronunciations. Common usage and common mispronunciation bring about "accepted" pronunciations. At some point in the future, real-a-tor and nu-cu-lar may turn up as accepted pronunciations.

Just as "Wensday" is today. Anyone who pronounces "Wednesday" so has no right to criticise other people's pronunciation.
A coworker (one with whom I work, not someone who orks cows) used the word supposably (sic) and I mentioned ... pronounce the word 'supposedly' as though it were 'supposably'. I just though it kind to bring this to your attention.

Tnen again,
.(1)

(1) Yes, yes, different meaning. But it's a word.

Bob Lieblich
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