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The tutor today told the students something that made me wonder. He told us that:

He is taller than me : WRONG

He is taller than I : CORRECT

I was shocked and then he told the class that the second one is correct because the phrase is actually 'He is taller than I (am)' as to equalise/balance the 'is' to something which in this case is 'am'

Is he right and is it true that the first one which I've been using my whole life is wrong? But previously no one ever told me that it is incorrect and I've always seen people wrote and still write using the first way! Emotion: tongue tied
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i suppose both are possible. in my opinion me sounds better than i. and i have never used that.

e.g. i'm stronger than him. but using of than me is common and using of than i is a little weird.

i don't remember that i've seen than i
Both are possible, I guess. "Than" can be a preposition or a conjunction. If you consider it's a conjunction, then you write "he's taller than I (am)". If you consider it's a preposition, then you use the complement form of the pronoun: "he's taller than me".
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Sorry, he was right.

This is where you get into what sounds right to your ears (taller than me) and what is right grammatically - (taller than I am).

It's sad but true that if you say "taller than I" people will think you're being snooty and pedantic, even though it's correct. But if you say "taller than I am" it sounds okay. So you have to choose: do you want to be wrong (than me), snooty (than I), or use the extra word (than I am).

Note that you'll run into the same problem if you try to say "I'm shorter than (him - wrong) (he - right but odd sounding to your ears) (he is - correct)."
So "than" cannot be considered as a preposition there?
But since I see most people 'me/him/...' I assumed it to be ok even though it is gramatically correct? Is it ok or no?
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Hmm. This could be a case of hyper-correction that I was subjected (or was is "subject"?) to when I was younger.

If I said I can jump higher than him - I mean I can jump higher than his height.

If I said I can jump higher than he - I mean my jumping ability is better than his jumping ability.

Likewise, referring to the other thread, if I said "I love you more than him," it means you hold a greater place in my affection than the un-named other male person. But if I said "I love you more than he," I mean that my affections for you are stronger than his affections for you (as if I could know!)

But "taller than a toadstool" or "bigger than a breadbox" do look like the toadstool and breadbox would take the objective case if it were a pronoun. So "taller than him" or "bigger than me" do "sound" right.

Clive - where are you?? Weigh in on this!
HMFindlay
The tutor today told the students something that made me wonder. He told us that:

He is taller than me : WRONG

He is taller than I : CORRECT

I was shocked and then he told the class that the second one is correct because the phrase is actually 'He is taller than I (am)' as to equalise/balance the 'is' to something which in this case is 'am'

Is he right and is it true that the first one which I've been using my whole life is wrong? But previously no one ever told me that it is incorrect and I've always seen people wrote and still write using the first way! Emotion: tongue tied

Hi,

“She can learn English faster than me” – This sound ok to me and I believe it is acceptable in conversational situation. Though, in a comparative context, I would say that “She can learn English fast than I can" is more grammatically correct. In another context, “I” would also be used following a subject. Ex: “She and I agree to work on this project together" . But often people would say “ she and me” which is incorrect in a literal sense.