I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) in such a short time before.
I really don't like this one either, because I think that reference to comparison should specify whom or what we are comparing to/with, but in this context it refers to competitors (and could actually be omitted). The translation as it stands reads:
"...our prices for ground services are comparative and highly competitive..."

My immediate gut-wrenching reaction was to replace "comparative" with "comparable". But maybe someone here can enlighten me as to the differences between the two, in case I have missed something. I would be very interested in the general view on this one.
Thanks!

Redwine
Hamburg
1 2
I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) in such a short time before.

The one redeeming feature of Alzheimer's is that you don't remember suffering from it.
I really don't like this one either, because I think that reference to comparison should specify whom or what we ... "...our prices for ground services are comparative and highly competitive..." My immediate gut-wrenching reaction was to replace "comparative" with "comparable".

If that's your feeling and if you also think you shouldn't compare where there's nothing to compare, maybe "incomparable" is the word for you.

Peter
(Apply irony tags where applicable.)
I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) in such a short time before. I really don't like ... two, in case I have missed something. I would be very interested in the general view on this one. Thanks!

"comparable" would mean "similar" - which contradicts "highly competitive".

Google finds "very comparative", as in "We have very comparative prices...". However, there are only about 15 hits.
My suggestion would be to either omit "comparative and", or risk "very comparative".

Peter Duncanson
UK
(posting from a.e.u)
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I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) in such a short time before. I really don't like ... (and could actually be omitted). The translation as it stands reads: "...our prices for ground services are comparative and highlycompetitive..."

Which German word are you trying to translate? "Comparative" is certainly wrong. "Comparable" is better but begs the question "comparable to/with what?" and seems redundant anyway if it's followed by "highly competitive".

Adrian
I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) ... reads: "...our prices for ground services are comparative and highly

competitive..." Which German word are you trying to translate? "Comparative" is certainly wrong. "Comparable" is better but begs the question "comparable to/with what?" and seems redundant anyway if it's followed by "highly competitive".

If I was doing the translation I would have left it out too! As I have mentioned elsewhere, this project requires the bare minimum in change and only where I can really justify it. The German is "vergleichbar" (appropriately declined, of course), which makes "comparable" on the surface correct. However, the responses here (and one private response - thanks but why?) all lead me to feel more convinced of my original reaction. I will remove it.

Redwine
Hamburg
I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) ... very interested in the general view on this one. Thanks!

"comparable" would mean "similar" - which contradicts "highly competitive".

Interesting. I had no problem with "comparable" in the sense of "comparing favourably" but I can see what you are getting at here. Thanks for the input.
Google finds "very comparative", as in "We have very comparative prices...". However, there are only about 15 hits.

Still doesn't really give me what I was looking for. With all due respect, I can google too - and already did! I was hoping for a clearer statement of how "comparative" could be used here, in terms of explaining how/why it means what it seems to be supposed to mean. This ain't meant to sound tetchy, Peter, just trying to clarify my question!
My suggestion would be toeither omit "comparative and", or risk "very comparative".

Don't get the "very comparative" yet. Really dissatisfied with comparing when the competitors are implied but not really mentioned as those with whom we compare. I think I will omit. Deadline on this 5000-word stage is one hour away now...
Thanks for your help.

Redwine
Hamburg
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I can't remember asking so many questions here (i.e. 2) in such a short time before.

The one redeeming feature of Alzheimer's is that you don't remember suffering from it.

I was recently in a comedy club in Berlin and heard the (IMO) brilliant line:
"I suffer from Bulimic Alzheimer's. I binge on food then forget to bring it up."
I really don't like this one either, because I think ... My immediate gut-wrenching reaction was to replace "comparative" with "comparable".

If that's your feeling and if you also think you shouldn't compare where there's nothing to compare, maybe "incomparable" is the word for you.

That would certainly be nice if I were writing the text by myself. As I am trying to work on the basis of an existing translation and with strong reference to the original I don't feel comfortable changing that, so I will drop the word altogether - easier to justify, simply by pointing out that it is (IMO) bad English usage to refer to comparison without nominating the, er, comparands ;-)

Redwine
Hamburg
I was not meaning to imply that you had not googled. I simply mentioned the mumber of hits to show that the phrase was rare - and probably an unwise choice.

Peter Duncanson
UK
(posting from a.e.u)
"...our prices for ground services are comparative and highly competitive..." My immediate gut-wrenching reaction was to replace "comparative" with "comparable". ... the two, in case I have missed something. I would be very interested in the general view on this one.

My sense of the appropriate use of "comparative" suggests that it belongs with a noun derived from a verb, in which case such an action is implied to include a comparison or to have been based on one. So although "comparative pricing" is perfectly intelligible, "comparative prices" is less so.
As for "comparable", to me it tends to emphasize the similarity rather than the differences between things, being more or less synonymous with "commensurate" (although the latter is pretty much restricted to quantitative criteria, while "comparable" can equally describe qualities). Substituted for "comparative" above (and without mentioning the competitors' prices) I would take it to mean that "our prices" can be compared with each other, which I don't think is at all the intended meaning.

Odysseus
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