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Hi,

Which is the correct answer to the sentence correction question below?

In the 1980's, the rate of increase of the minority population of the United States was nearly the 1970's.

A) twice as fast as
B) twice as fast as it was in
C) twice what it was in
D) two times faster than that of
E) two times greater than

thanks,

/P
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Hi,

It seems to me that the sentence would be better if changed into "In the 1980s, ...."
and B as well as D sound right to me.

Looking forward to other comments. Thank you.
Neither B nor D is correct.

Anyone else can help?

thanks,

/P
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Hi,

Which is the correct answer to the sentence correction question below?

In the 1980's, the rate of increase of the minority population of the United States was nearly the 1970's.

A) twice as fast as
B) twice as fast as it was in
C) twice what it was in
D) two times faster than that of
E) two times greater than

thanks,

I would say B and C are strictly correct, but you hear a lot of people say A.
Clive
Hi,
I would say B and C are strictly correct, but you hear a lot of people say A.
Clive
The correct answer is C.

This is also a question from a GMAT exam.

Btw, I chose B. I couldn't get any explanation from the ETS.

/P
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This is an exercise in thinking clearly about words that name parameters and words that express the values of the parameters. Consider "Prices are getting very expensive these days". What's wrong with it? Well, you don't buy prices. You buy items that are for sale. So the correction is one of the following:

Prices are getting very high these days. (Prices can be higher or lower.)
Things are getting very expensive these days. (Things can be more or less expensive.)

That in mind, a rate is a ratio of numbers. In this case it is the number of additional people per some unit of time, say, a year.

Being basically just a number, a rate cannot go faster or slower; it can't be faster or slower. Which is faster, the number 50% or the number 60%? Well, neither is moving, so it's not a logical question, right? However, a number may be twice what another number is. 8 is twice 4, 12 is twice 6, and so on. So a rate can easily be twice what another rate was.
This eliminates A, B, and D, all of which use the word "fast(er)".

Second point: The correct expression is "in the 1980's" (1970's, ...)
This eliminates any choice which doesn't end in the word "in"; it eliminates A, D, and E.

(E is especially bad because it says the rate is greater than the years, which is comparing the incomparable, which makes for pure nonsense.)

Only C remains standing under this sort of scrutiny!

There may be other reasons to select C. See what other members post.

Emotion: geeked
I like your explanation. In particular, I like the 'price' example. I knew we should say 'a price is high or low'. It didn't occur to me that we should say 'a rate is high or low' too.

thanks, Jim

/P
Hi Jim,
You say that a rate is ‘just a number, a rate cannot go faster or slower’. My dictionary gives one meaning of rate as ‘a rapidity of movement or change’, eg a rate of 50 kph.
So why can’t one rapidity be faster than another? Do we really want to say that one rapidity is higher than another?

Can we not say that a rate of 50 kph is ‘faster’ than a rate of 20kph?

Regards,
Clive
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