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I don't understand the meaning of this sentence from St Teresa of Avila:

"Yours are the eyes through which Christ's compassion for the world is to look out."

If I rearrange the sentence, it will be like this:

"Christ's compassion for the world is to look out through your eyes."

But it doesn't make sense to me. How can "compassion" look out? Am i wrong in my interpretation?
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It seems a bit figurative. Eg, we often speak of seeing something through someone else's eyes, just as we speak of walking in someone else's shoes figuratively.

I don't think your rearrangement flies. "To" can be used in many ways.
"To" in the original example is like "We are to go shopping tomorrow."
It's sort of a mixture of purpose and future intent.

I take the original quote as something like,
"Christ is not here physically, so you must look out on the world with compassion in his stead."
Your body will be a conduit for his compassion.
Whether or not this leads to some sort of action is between you and St. Teresa.

Does that make any sense?
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KeroroYours are the eyes through which Christ's compassion for the world is (supposed) to look out.
You are supposed to take the place of Christ and see the world through his eyes. He felt compassion for the people he saw through his eyes. You are supposed to do the same.

CJ
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