+0
I have this complete imperative presented in my book, it goes like this:
let me go
go
let him go
let her go
let it go
let us go
go
let them go

I don't understand why 2nd person singular and plural is only GO.
+0
Hi,

I have this complete imperative presented in my book, it goes like this:
let me go
go
let him go
let her go
let it go
let us go
go
let them go

I don't understand why 2nd person singular and plural is only GO.


I don't understand your book, because I don't really see that you can 'conjugate' an imperative. Strictly speaking, the imperative is just the infinitive without 'to'. eg Go! It's usually said directly to the person that you wish to give the order to. If I wanted to issue the order via someone else, I would say to that person something like '(Please) tell him to go'. I can't think of a case where I would say to myself, 'Go'.

Let's go is really a 'pseudo imperative', which is a bit more like a suggestion.

Note that the phrase 'let someone go' also has the meaning of 'release someone'. 'Let me go' is what I would say if someone grabbed hold of me.

In short, I think you've got the wrong idea about this.Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive

+0
For some reason, I think your book is aiming at structures like:

that I go, that you go, that he go, ...
or
that I may go, that you may go, that he may go, ...
or
that I should go, that you should go, that he should go, ...
or similar subjunctive and pseudo-subjunctive forms,
none of which are really imperatives, but only "imperative-like".

I don't think it makes sense to think of anything but the second person when discussing imperatives: Go!

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
You can't say direct to a person Let you go by train
You can say Go by train! / You are to go by train. / You must go by train.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
A Practical English Grammar (Oxford):

The second person imperative
Hurry! Wait!
Don't hurry!
Be quiet, Tom.
do can be placed before the affirmative imperative:
Do hurry. Do be quiet.
This do could be persuasive, but could also express irritation.

The first person imperative
Form
let us (let's) + bare infinitive:
Let us stand together in this emergency.
Let us not be alarmed by rumours

It is possible in colloquial English to put don't before let's:
Don't let's be alarmed by rumors.
By let us (let's) the speaker can urge his hearers to act in a certain way, or express a decision which they are expected to accept, or express a suggestion.

Thethird person imperative
Form
let him/her/it/them + bare infinitive:
Let them go by train
This is not a very common construction in modern English. It would be more usual to say:
They are to go/must go by train.
The negative imperative, let him/her/them + negative infinitive, is not used in modern English.
Instead, we would use must not or is/are not to:
They must not/are not to go by air.