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It will be complete in 2 weeks.
It will be completed in 2 weeks.

Which sentence out of the above two is correct any why?
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Comments  
for your information:)

I think both are correct.
The second sentence is absolutely right. It is the Passive Voice.

In the first sentence it is the Active Voice. I think it's correct, too. But I like the other version more.
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To me those are both correct...

[Y]
It will be complete in two weeks.

The finished product will be ready and available after two weeks have passed.

It will be completed in two weeks.

The finished product will be ready and available after two weeks have passed.
OR
The product will be worked on during a period of two weeks, making it finished, ready, and available at the end of the two-week period.

In the first case, you are allowing for the possibility that work on the product may not start until 10, 11, maybe 12 days after you utter the statement.

In the second case, you may be saying the same thing as in the first case, OR, you may be saying that work on the product will be carried on during the entire two-week period.

CJ
Thank you guys, especially Cajifilm for clearing my doubt.
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Semantically, this is not the difference between the two sentences:

1. It will be complete (in two weeks).

2. It will be completed (in two weeks).

Let's break up these two sentences:

1. It will be complete in two weeks.

Here, complete is an adjective. The adjective complete means in this context, 'having all the necessary parts or appropriate parts' with derivative meanings such as 'finished,' 'having run its full course,' 'entire' and 'full.' (Oxford Dictionary)

2. It will be completed in two weeks.

Here, (to be) completed is the passive voice of the transitive verb (to) complete. The verb (to) complete could take the following definitions in this context, 'finish making or doing; making (something) whole or perfect; etc.' (Oxford)

So what is the difference?

The adjective complete -- although it carries other meanings such as, 'to the greatest extent or degree' or 'total' -- describes a state composed of many parts. This nuanced definition differs from the verb (to) complete, which describes merely a state of resolution or finish without an indication of composites.
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