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At this moment, my room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives more pleasant and calm look to everything.
Without these two words, can we take sentence as complete sentence? or including is better?

thanks !
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Either way is fine, but you should say "it gives a more pleasant and calm look etc."

Best wishes, - A.
AvangiEither way is fine, but you should say "it gives a more pleasant and calm look etc."

Best wishes, - A.

My thoughts exactly.
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Thanks Guys !
Well rephrase the sentence like this and put article at end:
At this moment, my room have filled with such vibrant colors that everything gives a dulcet look

I looked in dictionary and its mean pleasent and sweet. Is it fits the context
Thanks
Cute572 At this moment, my room have filled with such vibrant colors that everything gives a dulcet look
"my room is filled" as in your original; or, "my room has been filled"

"everything has a dulcet look"

You could possibly say, "everything gives a dulcet impression," or "gives off a dulcet aura." (a little bit sickening, but what the heck)

Best wishes, - A,

Edit. The reason we have to change the verb is because you moved the "everything" to an earlier spot.

"gives a [bright] look to everytning"

"has a [bright] look."
I don't think that "vibrant" goes with the idea of "calm."

I've never used the word "dulcet" in my life except to use in jest with "dulcet tones" -- how something sounds, not how it looks.

I like the entire sentence except the use of a word meaning "calm." The colors are so vibrant it makes the whole room seem alive would be the sense you're going for, not calm.
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Thanks Guys!
Yes GG, I have changed this calm word seemed strange here.
Thanks !
Cute572 At this moment, my room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives more pleasant and calm look to everything.

Without these two words, can we take sentence as complete sentence? or including is better?Hi Cute572, This is probably not on your radar screen right now, but I've noticed a small conflict in my advice to you. In your original, you asked if the sentence is okay when we omit "to everything," and I said it works either way.

Later in the thread you moved "to everything" to an earlier part of the sentence, and I said because of this you need to change the verb from "gives" to "has." You may have noticed my lack of consistency.

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives a cheerful look to everything. okay

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it has a cheerful look. okay

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives a cheerful impression. okay

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives a cheerful look. I'm not sure. Perhaps someone else could double check this.

I don't think you posted your final version, so I don't know if this actually applies.

Best wishes, - A.
AvangiMy room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives a cheerful look to everything. okay

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it has a cheerful look. okay

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives a cheerful impression. okay

My room is filled with such vibrant colors that it gives a cheerful look. I'm not sure. Perhaps someone else could double check this.
The first is wrong in my view. A room cannot "give a cheerful look to everything" (the colours could, but that's not what the sentence says).

The fourth seems dubious to me. A room can "have a cheerful look" (i.e. look cheerful), or it can "give a cheerful impression", but I'm not sure it can "give a cheerful look". (Again, the colours could give a cheerful look to the room, but that's not what the sentence says.)
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