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When a typical Korean, who learn English in public school, is asked 'what do you normally do after school?,' they might say: I have to go to an institute.

I made a complicated sentence.

Is it not weird?(punctuations, structure etc.)
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Hi,
When a typical Korean, who learn English in public school, is asked 'what do you normally do after school?,' they might say: I have to go to an institute.

I made a complicated sentence.

Is it not weird?(punctuations, structure etc.)

No, it's not weird. hre are a few small edits.
When a typical Korean, who learned English in a public school, is asked 'what do you normally do after school?', they might say: 'I have to go to an institute'.

You don't really need a colon. I'd just use a comma.

Clive
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Thank you all the time Clive^^

'what do you normally do after school?', they might say: 'I have to go to an institute'.





I remember that someone says 'when we use a comma or full-stop etc, with quotation marks, we put them inside of the quotation marks i.e. 'I have to go to an institute.'



Is either inside or outside the quotation marks OK?
Hi,

If you are just talking about a comma, I think this is a difference betqween American English and British English.

But in any kind of English, you can't put a comma directly after a question mark.

Clive