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I stumbled on a book, Words on Words: A Dictionary for Writers and Others who Care about Words by the late John Brenner ( https://www.amazon.com/Words-John-B-Bremner/dp/0231044933 )

In a section of his book, he classifies five types of the sentences (the four we know): simple, compound, complex, compound-complex, and complex-complex sentence. I am happy to say that I now own a copy of the book, Words on Words written by the late John B. Bremner, I love his entry on sentences that I have decided to put the whole thing(including complex-complex sentence) here and see what you think of it.

Sentences
A sentence is a grammatical unit that conveys a complete thought and contains a subject and a predicate, either or both of which may be understated but understood. Sentences are principally classified as simple,
compound, complex, compound-complex, complex-complex. Thus: -A simple sentence consists of one independent clause: \"He knows almost nothing.\"

A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses connected by a coordinating conjunction: \"He knows almost nothing and he doesn\'t want to study.\" and \"He knows almost nothing and he doesn\'t want to study but he may change.\"

A complex sentence consists of an independent clause and one or more dependent clauses: \"He knows almost nothing because he refuses to study.\" and \"Because he refuses to study, he doesn\'t know he should.\"

A compound-complex sentence consists of two or independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses: \"He knows that he should study but he doesn\'t want to.\" and \"He knows that he should study but he doesn\'t think that he has a chance of passing.\"

A complex-complex sentence consists of an independent clause and a dependent clause that is subordinate to another dependent clause: \"He got mad when I told him that he should study.\"

Before I had this book in my possession, I attempted to create a complex-complex sentence and here is what I came up with: \"Now, the popular kids were pursuing those that once pursued them that they had rejected in
the past.\"

I ran this sentence by Nancy Sullivan, who is the author of Essential Grammar, who said that the second
dependent clause of my sentence \"that they had rejected in the past\" was awkward. She created her own version: \"Now, the boy was buying cars that needed parts that were difficult to find.\"

I want to know what you think of this and is it possible for to create your own complex-complex sentence based on your understanding of it?

What about variations of a complex-complex sentence?:
Independent clause with multiple dependent clauses subordinate to another dependent clause
Independent clause with dependent clause subordinate to other multiple dependent clauses
Independent clause with multiple dependent clauses subordinate to their own dependent clause
Independent clause with multiple dependent clauses subordinate to their own dependent clauses

Let me know what you think. I would love to hear what have to say about it.

Thank you,

Nancy Pal
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1. Think of a clause as a module. The modules can be connected in any unlimited combination as long as you follow some basic rules of conjunctions and punctuation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_English_sentence

Here is a very famous sentence with 17 clauses, 15 of which are independent.

“It was the best of times (1), it was the worst of times (2), it was the age of wisdom (3), it was the age of foolishness (4), it was the epoch of belief (5), it was the epoch of incredulity (6), it was the season of Light (7), it was the season of Darkness (8), it was the spring of hope (9), it was the winter of despair (10), we had everything before us (11), we had nothing before us (12), we were all going direct to Heaven (13), we were all going direct the other way (14) —in short, the period was so far like the present period (15), that some of its noisiest authorities insisted (16) on its being received (17), for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.” —A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens


2. The longer the sentence, the more careful a writer must be, so as to preserve clarity and logic. Good writers vary the sentence types in a paragraph, so the train of thought is cohesive and smoothly flowing.


3. The section you quoted defines a sentence, but not a clause. In recent systems of grammar, a clause is a syntactic unit with a subject (explicit or understood) and predicate (the verb can be inflected or non-finite); the difference between an independent and dependent clause is the idea of "complete" versus "incomplete" thought.


Some writing builds on longer and longer sentences. An example is the nursery rhyme "The house that Jack built." The last sentence has 18 clauses, which begins with a very simple independent clause followed by a recursive pattern of relative clauses —dependent clauses within dependent clauses.

This is the farmer (1) sowing his corn (2),
That kept the cock (3) that crowed in the morn (4),
That waked the priest (5) all shaven and shorn (6),
That married the man (7) all tattered and torn (8),
That kissed the maiden (9) all forlorn (10),
That milked the cow (11) with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog (12),
That worried the cat (13),
That killed the rat (14),
That ate the malt (15)
That lay in the house (17) that Jack built (18).

Comments  
Respected Sir,

I stumbled on a book, Words on Words: A Dictionary for Writers and Others who Care about Words by the late John Brenner ( https://www.amazon.com/Words-John-B-Bremner/dp/0231044933 )

In a section of his book, he classifies five types of the sentences (the four we know): simple, compound, complex, compound-complex, and complex-complex sentence. I am happy to say that I now own a copy of the book, Words on Words written by the late John B. Bremner, I love his entry on sentences that I have decided to put the whole thing(including complex-complex sentence) here and see what you think of it.

Sentences
A sentence is a grammatical unit that conveys a complete thought and contains a subject and a predicate, either or both of which may be understated but understood. Sentences are principally classified as simple,
compound, complex, compound-complex, complex-complex. Thus: -A simple sentence consists of one independent clause: \"He knows almost nothing.\"

A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses connected by a coordinating conjunction: \"He knows almost nothing and he doesn\'t want to study.\" and \"He knows almost nothing and he doesn\'t want to study but he may change.\"

A complex sentence consists of an independent clause and one or more dependent clauses: \"He knows almost nothing because he refuses to study.\" and \"Because he refuses to study, he doesn\'t know he should.\"

A compound-complex sentence consists of two or independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses: \"He knows that he should study but he doesn\'t want to.\" and \"He knows that he should study but he doesn\'t think that he has a chance of passing.\"

A complex-complex sentence consists of an independent clause and a dependent clause that is subordinate to another dependent clause: \"He got mad when I told him that he should study.\"

Before I had this book in my possession, I attempted to create a complex-complex sentence and here is what I came up with: \"Now, the popular kids were pursuing those that once pursued them that they had rejected in
the past.\"

I ran this sentence by Nancy Sullivan, who is the author of Essential Grammar, who said that the second
dependent clause of my sentence \"that they had rejected in the past\" was awkward. She created her own version: \"Now, the boy was buying cars that needed parts that were difficult to find.\"

I want to know what you think of this and is it possible for to create your own complex-complex sentence based on your understanding of it?

What about variations of a complex-complex sentence?:
Independent clause with multiple dependent clauses subordinate to another dependent clause
Independent clause with dependent clause subordinate to other multiple dependent clauses
Independent clause with multiple dependent clauses subordinate to their own dependent clause
Independent clause with multiple dependent clauses subordinate to their own dependent clauses

Let me know what you think. I would love to hear what have to say about it.

Thank you,

Nancy Pal
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