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Debora -Do you think I could also get a little tour?
Ivy -I don't know. Marty doesn't want guests in certain areas of the house.
Debora -I would have loved to have seen more of your work, but I guess
Marty's the boss. (impossible situation)

As I understood it:
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it's a regret of unaccomplished situation:

I wish I have (already) seen more of your work by now, but alas, I still haven't seen it, but I think Marty's the boss.

There are two other possibilities that come to my mind

1. I would have loved to see more of your work
Meaning - I would like to see more of your work, that would be cool, but I haven't seen it and I don't care, whatever

2. I would love to see more of your work
means - yes, I agree to see more of your work (more like a polite response to an offer)
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All these are my speculation and I was wondering to what degree are they right?

Comments  
apkemuI wish I had (already) seen more of your work by now, but alas, I still haven't seen it, but I think Marty's the boss.

No. The doubled perfect tenses are ungrammatical, but people do say it that way. What she meant is "I would have loved to see more of your work, and I would have seen it if we could have gone into the part of the house where your work is, but if Marty says we can't go there, then we have to obey, and I cannot see it, sadly."

apkemuI would have loved to have seen to see ...

See 'I would like to have done' vs 'I would have liked to do'

CJ

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CalifJimI would have loved to have seen to see ...

This is the whole point! I would say so, but Deborah said exactly this on HACKS: I would have loved to have seen more of your work, and it's not because she's ignorant, in fact she's a well educated woman. Her goal was to get the other person to show her another part of the house, and she did so with a subtlety of grammatical construction unknown to people whose first language is not English.

apkemuI would say so, but Deborah said exactly this ...

I don't see the relevance of the fact that Deborah, whoever she is, said that.

Emotion: tongue tied

Where grammar is concerned, you may often find differences of opinion.

CJ

CalifJimI don't see the relevance of the fact that Deborah, whoever she is, said that.

I don't see that too, but on my opinion there is the hidden meaning in it, otherwise why would she go the whole 9 yards?

That hidden sense get her opponent acting as she intended to. If she said "I would have loved to see more of your work" that could not have yielded the desirable result.

Maybe the extent of hidden desire in Deborah's sentence is higher than in that other one.

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apkemuIf she said "I would have loved to see more of your work" that could not have yielded the desirable result.

I don't see why not.

She would have loved to see it, but she did not.
She would have loved to have seen it, but she did not.

It seems to me that the second one says the same thing but with more (and unnecessary) words.

CJ

In that topic you posted this one in which Geoff Pullum called "would have liked to have VERBed" construction "double marking", and gave it a grammatical and logical analysis. According to him:
[3] She would have loved to see it, but she did not.
Speaking (now) She would have liked at a certain point in the past to see it at that same point in the past.
[4] She would have loved to have seen it, but she did not.
Speaking (now) She would have liked at a certain point in the past to have seen it at some earlier point t0.

"As Fowler suggests, the double marking feels like a way of emphasizing the irrealis character of the embedded clause"

This is really clicks with me - I have felt the emphasizing in that double marking phrase.

apkemuThis is really clicks with me ...

Then I think you should use it.

CJ

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