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Hello
In Strategy Safari (By Henry Mintzberg), we read:
"a surprising amount of hard information is unreliable. Soft information is supposed to be unreliable, subject to all kinds of biases. Hard information, in contrast, is supposed to be concrete and precise; it is, after all, transmitted and stored electronically. In fact, hard information can be far worse than soft information. Something is always lost in the process of quantification — before those electrons are activated."

Then in continue, we read:

"Anyone who has ever produced a quantitative measure — whether a reject count in a factory or a publication count in a university — knows just how much distortion is possible."

I think the author suggest two examples (whether a reject count in a factory or a publication count in a university) that are not fit to what he say. The examples (the number of products that are rejected in a factory, or the number of publication in a university) are a quantitative data and don't need the process of quantitation. Also, in contrast to soft data, measuring the mentioned hard data (the number of products that are rejected in a factory, or the number of publication in a university) is not a hard work to the extent that something is always lost in the process of quantification or to the extent that much distortion occur.

I think the author suggest two example that are not fit to what he bring up. You don't?

I will appreciate your help.

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It took me this long to figure out what you're asking. Let me see if I can correct your question to say what you mean:

"I think the author suggests two examples (a reject count in a factory and a publication count in a university) that do not fit what he is saying. The examples are already quantitative data and don't need the process of quantification. Also, in contrast to soft data, measuring the mentioned hard data (the number of products that are rejected in a factory and the number of publications in a university) is not the product of a complex task in which something can be lost in the process of quantification or much distortion can occur.

I think the author suggest two example that do not fit. Do you?"

I agree with you.

Comments  
anonymousI think the author suggest two example that do not fit.

Oops. The author suggests.