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Hello,

I have gone through a few books and a number of links; still, I haven’t received a clear answer what the Compound Subject and the Compound Predicate are.

Let’s consider a sentence: “My mother and her friends cooked and chatted for hours”.

Which one is the Compound Subject:


  1. My mother and her friends cooked and chatted for hours.

  2. My mother and her friends cooked and chatted for hours.


Which one is the Compound Predicate:


  1. My mother and her friends cooked and chatted for hours.

  2. My mother and her friends cooked and chatted for hours.


Thank you.
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When I was a young lad, we often used the terms "simple subject" and "simple predicate." The simple subject was usually a single noun or pronoun and the simple predicate was usually a single verb.
When there were two subjects (compound subject), we would list two nouns. When there were two predicates (compound predicate), we'd list two verbs.

When there was a single subject, we'd distinguish between the simple subject and the complete subject.
The big dog on the porch barked at the mailman.
The simple subject is "dog." The complete subject is "the big dog on the porch."
Similarly, the simple predicate is "barked." The complete predicate is "barked at the mailman."

I think you need to separate in your mind the concepts "simple" vs. "complete," and the concepts "subject" vs. "compound subject."

When you have subordinate clauses modifying the subject or subjects, the thing gets more complicated. Do you consider these clauses part of the subject??

If you happen to get into the "diagramming" of sentences, this should become clear.
Comments  
Isn't the compound subject "My mother and her friends", and the compound predicate "cooked and chatted for hours"?
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 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
yes
thanks for these valuable information..Emotion: smile
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