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I came across this sentence in the book which I have been reading, and I can't understand why two prepositons are used together here. Or, is it just a mistake?

'Concerning about this topic, let me ask you some questions.'

Thanks for your help in advance.

Candy
Comments  
The sentence is wrong. It should be:

"Concerning this topic, let me ask you some questions."

But, "Let me ask you some questions concerning this topic." would be even better.
You can be "concerned about" something - but that's using "concern" as a verb, not as a preposition. I agree with Chameleon that the above sentence is wrong though.

Rommie
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Let me ask you some questions concerning this topic. I would guess that "concerning" means "regarding" in this sentence.
Thanks for your responses. Emotion: smile

When I read this sentense, I thought 'concernig' was used as a gerund here, for 'concern' is a verb and there's a phrase 'to concern about.' I looked them up in my dictionary, and for the first time I noticed that the words like 'concerning' and 'regarding' are prepositions.
Then, I was puzzled. Why two prepositions are sticking together here?
So, it was a mistake.

Especially when they appear at the beginning of sentenses, for example;
"Concerning this topic,....."
"Regarding this article,....."
.....those prepositions look like gerunds for me, such as;
"Speaking of her, ...." (Is 'to speak' used as a gerund here? Or, it's just a phrase??)

Are there many prepositions such as 'regarding' and 'concerning'? I mean, the form of the words are structured as 'verb + ing'? :-S

Candy
I have one more question!!
Why "Let me ask you some questions concerning this topic." is better than the other sentence?
Many thanks for your help!!

Candy
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"Speaking of her, ...." (Is 'to speak' used as a gerund here? Or, it's just a phrase??)


The giveaway word here is "of". That's a preposition. You don't get two prepositions in a row - at least, not usually - so "speaking" must be a verb.

It's not even a gerund, so far as I can tell. It's a real verb, present tense, pure and simple. I think there's a lot of ellipsis. It is short for "Since we were speaking of her, ...". (In fact, if someone says "Speaking of her" when you WEREN'T speaking of her, it would be quite acceptable to repond: "Were we?").

Rommie