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Hi, Help me please figure out the meaning of the word concession in this context. "Thousands of auto workers in Canada face the prospect of pay and job cuts today after a $17, 4 billion ( U.S) aid package to teetering General Motors and Chrysler that contemplates significant concessions by American employees.

Concession might be 1. "something you allow something"
2.price reduction
3. right
concessions 4. the thing sold
Thank you.
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Hi,
Help me please figure out the meaning of the word concession in this context. "Thousands of auto workers in Canada face the prospect of pay and job cuts today after a $17, 4 billion ( U.S) aid package to teetering General Motors and Chrysler that contemplates significant concessions by American employees.

Concession might be 1. "something you allow something"
2.price reduction
3. right
concessions 4. the thing sold

'Concession' is based on the verb 'concede', which means, in this context, to give up or surrender a right or privilege, something that you have.

Here's the idea. The employees' unions have contracts with the employers that guarantee wage levels, as well as benefits such as health care and pensions. The employers want the employees to say, for example, 'OK, we kow we have the right to $35 an hour. However, we will give up this right and accept $25 an hour'.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you, Clive. I was also baffled by a preposition "by" "contemplates significant concessions ( wages reduction) by American employees. There should be "to" probably or "employers". What do you think?
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Hi,
"Thousands of auto workers in Canada face the prospect of pay and job cuts today after a $17, 4 billion ( U.S) aid package to teetering General Motors and Chrysler that contemplates significant concessions by American employees.

I was also baffled by a preposition "by" "contemplates significant concessions ( wages reduction) by American employees. There should be "to" probably or "employers". What do you think?

A common verb with 'concession' is 'make' , or sometimes 'yield'.
Here's a simple example.
Tom: I 'd like to go to a movie.
Mary: I'd like to watch TV.
Tom: OK, I'll watch TV with you.
A concession was made by Tom to Mary.

In your example,
concessions may be made by Amercican employees ( to their employers. )
The 'to' phrase is implicit because we can understand it from the context.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi, Clive

I wonder which word(s) of the sentence the verb "contemplate" refers to. Could you tell me, please ?

My best guess is that it refers to "General Motors and Chrysler" on account of they are the sole employers mentioned in the sentence.

Then another question springs into my mind: why did they use "contemplates" with "s" at the end? There are two companies in question, of all things.

In case you need to read up on the whole article, let me give you a reference to it: http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/556754  (I hope I'm not contravening any rule by posting a link like that.)

Thanks !
Clive, thank you, got it now. MrPernickety, like the Star paper, do you? You have a good question, I'm also interested, why?
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Hi,

I wonder which word(s) of the sentence the verb "contemplate" refers to. Could you tell me, please ?

My best guess is that it refers to "General Motors and Chrysler" on account of they are the sole employers mentioned in the sentence. No, it's 'the aid package that contemplates . . . '

It implicitly means that the people who designed the package designned it with the idea that concessions by the autoworkers were very possible.
Actually, when I heard the news, I didn't hear the word 'contemplate'. I thought concessions were 'required'. I don't know, I'd better read the newspaper tomorrow to find out the true situation.

Then another question springs into my mind: why did they use "contemplates" with "s" at the end? There are two companies in question, of all things.'Package' is singular.

In case you need to read up on the whole article, let me give you a reference to it: http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/556754 (I hope I'm not contravening any rule by posting a link like that.) Don't worry.It's good to give sources.

Clive
Clive, thanks again.
Hi Alex
"Thousands of auto workers in Canada face the prospect of pay and job cuts today after a $17, 4 billion ( U.S) aid package to teetering General Motors and Chrysler that contemplates significant concessions by American employees.
I agree with Clive. To me, it is the "aid package" that "contemplates" in that sentence.
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