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Hi.

Would it be the same as mixed conditional sentence: If you had studied hard, you would be working here now. if I say : If you had studied hard, you would have been working here. ?

In my impression the latter could mean past progressive while the former is present. Please check.

Thank you very much in advance.
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I personally prefer to keep the conditional as straight as the grammar books. However, we will always run into folks who think mixing conditional are acceptable. So here is my take:
If you studied hard, you would be working by now. OK
If you had studied hard, you would have been working by now. ? OK. But to emphasize the counter-factual sentiment, the 3rd conditional is the correct choice

Thank you very much DE for your explanation.

dimsumexpressI personally prefer to keep the conditional as straight as the grammar books. However, we will always run into folks who think mixing conditional are acceptable.

I also think it's a right way.


So I've encountered a web reference which shows:

Examples to work, Past continuous conditional

If she hadn't got a job in London (but she did), she would have been working in Paris (but she wasn't).

If I'd had any money I'd have been drinking with my friends in the pub that night.


I'm thinking that if I dropped by now from your example, it could mean either hypothetical present continuous event or hypothetical past continuous event:


If you had studied hard, you would have been working.

It seems like we need context in this cases to know which time this sentence is meant to be. Or first of all is this conditional form(3rd+progressive) used commonly?

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Hi,
kook jIf you had studied hard, you would have been working. It seems like we need context in this cases to know which time this sentence is meant to be. Or first of all is this conditional form(3rd+progressive) used commonly?
That's the kind of mixed conditional I try to avoid. What you have is a type 2 and 3 mixed structure, Keep it in either type 2 or type 3. Don't mix them. Some people think it is ok. but it is not something that will earn a "check mark" from the grammarians.

Please take a look:

Conditional Sentences Type II

Complete the Conditional Sentences Type II.
  • If he tried harder, he would reach his goals.
  • I would buy these shoes if they fitted .
  • It would not surprise me if he did not know the answer.

Conditional Sentences Type III

Complete the Conditional Sentences Type III.
  • If we had listened to the radio, we would have heard the news.
  • If you had switched on the lights, you would not have fallen over the chair.
  • She would have come to our party if she had not been on holiday.
looool
it should be link to if it will happen in future not to be accepted
I apologize for completely forgetting to answer this question.

If you had studied hard, you would have been working. It seems like we need context in this cases to know which time this sentence is meant to be. Or first of all is this conditional form(3rd+progressive) used commonly?

The answer is, yes, not only is it common, more importantly, it is the only grammatically correct form. We cannot say"
If you had studied hard, you would have worked".
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Anon,
Do you have a question? Please make your point clearly.
Hi.
dimsumexpressWe cannot say"If you had studied hard, you would have worked".
What do you mean DE? I definitely think we can say this:If you had studied hard, you would have worked.