Which of these sentences is correct?

1. If no information was provided regarding costs, then that would be an area of concern.

2. If no information was provided regarding costs, then that is an area of concern.

Are both possible or only the first?
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AnonymousAre both possible or only the first?
Both are OK.
Mister Micawber AnonymousAre both possible or only the first?Both are OK.
Thanks, teacher. I know that the first one is a second conditional, but what is the first one? I think it is a mixed but what are the clauses consisted of and how is it possible? is it a type two followed by a type one? If so, what does that meaning and how does it differ from the first example?
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Anonymous is it a type two followed by a type one?
I don't read either sentence as a conditional; the first clause of each seems to me to be a confirmation of a fact. The 'would' in the second clause is a polite form: it lessens the likelihood of concern.
Mister Micawber Anonymous is it a type two followed by a type one?I don't read either sentence as a conditional; the first clause of each seems to me to be a confirmation of a fact. The 'would' in the second clause is a polite form: it lessens the likelihood of concern.
I am surprised to hear the they are not conditionals because the the first clause starts with 'if' and the construction of the sentences is like a typical conditional, for example, "if I lost my car keys, then that would definitely be a concern. What is the difference between this sentences the previous ones that you said were not conditionals?
All I know is that not all 'if' clauses are hypothetical/conditional: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/verbs/verbs-time-clauses-and-if-clauses

To me, it sounds like the person receiving your two sentences from the speaker/writer has already told the latter that no information was provided (that's why the sentences use 'was' not 'were').
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Mister MicawberAll I know is that not all 'if' clauses are hypothetical/conditional: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/verbs/verbs-time-clauses-and-if-clauses To me, it sounds like the person receiving your two sentences from the speaker/writer has already told the latter that no information was provided (that's why the sentences use 'was' not 'were').
I see what you are saying. However, the site you provided does not indicate that not all 'if' clauses are hypothetical. In fact, I think it shows that its use is hypothetical or conditional, at least, that is what I understood.

I do agree with what you said regarding what it conveys, but I think the format is conditional, just as all the examples in the site you provided, which is why I am confused now because I was given similar sentences in class that are consideredconditionals!
Anonymous the site you provided does not indicate that not all 'if' clauses are hypothetical.
"Some clauses with if are like hypotheses so we use past tense forms to talk about the present and future."
Mister Micawber Anonymous the site you provided does not indicate that not all 'if' clauses are hypothetical."Some clauses with if are like hypotheses so we use past tense forms to talk about the present and future."
Yes, teacher, I saw that sentence but no examples were provided to demonstrate that and all the examples below it were in conditional format. Was that sentences stated just to say that there are 'if' clauses that look like hypothesis but are not actually, due to not seeing any examples that demonstrate that?
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