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Scenario: She has a performance coming up in a month and she is given a chance to become a star in Hollywood if she is good.

(Right now we are just having a chit chat, nothing serious. I just want to get an idea of what she will be doing if she wins. So how should I ask the question?)

1. If you do win the pageant and given a chance to become a star in Hollywood, are you going to give up school?

2. If you do win the pageant and given a chance to become a star in Hollywood, would you give up school? (Since she hasn't really thought about it and I'm asking her on the spot, I should use this right? Because she is probably going to change her mind about it?)

3. If you do win the pageant and given a chance to become a star in Hollywood, will you give up school?

4. I just want to get an idea of what she would be doing if she wins. (Is 'would' better than using 'will' ? 'Will' is too certain when she doesn't really know?)

Thanks.
Comments  
1- personal intent

2- polite 'will'-the speaker isn't sure of the listener's decision. The speaker thinks that she probably won't give up school but who knows! He could be wrong.

3- asking for the listener's opinion.

4- I'd say 'will' sounds better. If she doesn't have a plan in mind, she could say "I'll probably do this and that if I win."
Scenario: We might have a paintball game next month but we doubt it. A lot of people can't go.

1. If we had one next month, would you go? (This questions is out right? It doesn't make sense with the context?)

2. If we have one next month, would you go? (A month away is pretty long, who knows what's going to happen. Is 'would' better than 'will' ?)

3. If we have one next month, will you go? (#2 is better than #3?)

4. If we have one next month, I'll probably go. (Is this the best one out of all of them? I hear #2 a lot though. Is #2 almost the same as #4 in meaning?)

Thanks.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hello, Jack!

Now that you told us that chances are the ball game might not be held. Hence, I would go for #1.

If we have one next month(as you mentioned that we aren't fortune tellers), will you go? If we have, which means the speaker perceives there's a possibility in his mind, then 'will you go'? Or 'If we have one next month, would you like to go?'

#2 and # 4 are not the same. #2 is asking the listener's opinion, would you like to go? And # 4 is expressing the speaker's opinion.

I think the speaker's mind and the listener's are the determined factors that best decides when to use 'would' and 'will' appropriately.
Scenario: We might have a paintball game next month but we doubt it. A lot of people can't go.
What if the sentence were like this:



Scenario: We might have a paintball game next month but we doubt it because we might not have enough people.

1. If we have one next month, would you go? (So it is best to use this one?)

Thanks.