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I found the following sentences on a movie that I've watched recently. In that sentence they talk about present results of a past hypothetical situation. In fact, I cannot understand the grammar associated with these sentences. I mean, what a type of conditionals that the following sentence is related to: first, second, third or mixed.


Did we hurt your feelings?
I'm so sorry if we did.


If I had written the above sentence it would have used mixed conditionals like the following sentence.

I would be so sorry, if we had done.

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dileepaDid we hurt your feelings?
I'm so sorry if we did.

That is very common use of the if-clause. It is not first, second or third conditional. The other person knows the answer, so it is not a hypothetical situation, but something that actually happened.

If means "If it is true that (statement)"

e.g. If (it is true that ) we hurt your feelings, then I am sorry. (The person knows if his feelings were hurt or not.)

dileepaI would be so sorry, if we had done that.

Your sentence is incomplete. The verb "had done" requires an object.

In this case, the answer about hurting his feelings is unknown, because it is not an actual situation.

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dileepawhat a type what type of conditional is that the following sentence is related to: first, second, third or mixed?

It's not any of those. A conditional sentence is just a sentence that has an if-clause. You can use just about any tense in either clause of a conditional sentence.

Not all conditionals are numbered. Only the conditionals that are most troublesome for learners are numbered, and that's for the purpose of teaching. Most native speakers who are not involved in teaching English have no idea what first, second, and third conditional mean.

dileepaDid we hurt your feelings? I'm so sorry if we did.

Here it's just that if we hurt your feelings (in the past), we are very sorry (in the present) about the fact that we hurt your feelings (in the past).

It's one of those conditional sentences that I like to call self-referential. Both clauses reference (implicitly at least) the same action. The situation in the main clause is not necessarily caused by nor logically implied by the situation in the if-clause. These kinds of sentences don't usually fall into one of the three numbered categories.

If we hurt your feelings, I am sorry that we hurt your feelings.

"sorry" is a typical case. "sorry if" is almost equivalent to "sorry that".

I'm sorry if I said something controversial.
I'm sorry if I didn't address your concerns.

But there are other contexts:

There was an interesting article on gene splicing in the paper yesterday if you are interested in that sort of thing.
I'd rather not say, but if you really want to know, Tom and Jan just got divorced.

dileepa

If I had written ...
... like the following sentence.

I would be so sorry, if we had done. hurt your feelings.

No. That's far too indirect to be an effective apology.

CJ

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Comments  
CalifJimIt's not any of those.

Thanks, CJ. This was mind-bending to attempt to answer clearly.

The numbered conditionals have specific rules about tense and modal usage, and do not apply to many (maybe most ) sentences that have an if-clause.

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Thank you very much for the answer.

In fact, I'm bit confused because of these types of usages of "if". Therefore, I would be really grateful if you could give me some websites to learn what are the other usages of "if" apart from numbered conditionals such as zero, first, second, third, and mixed.

This learner's dictionary has many examples as well as discussions of the traditional numbered conditionals.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/if?q=if_1

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dileepa

In fact, I'm bit confused because of these types of usages of "if". Therefore, I would be really grateful if you could give me some websites to learn what are the other usages of "if" apart from numbered conditionals such as zero, first, second, third, and mixed.

I don't know of any sites that say anything about unnumbered conditionals. You might try to use Google to find linguistics articles about them, but those are sometimes written mostly for other linguists, so the vocabulary may be very specialized and hard to understand.

In any case I don't think it's necessary to do so much research on the topic. It seems to me that unnumbered conditionals are assumed to be about real situations — not about hypothetical situations — and the tenses used in them should be taken literally. However, in some cases an unnumbered conditional may be a variant of a numbered conditional.


Here are some examples I found online.

1) The container was examined physically if the gamma images showed something unusual.
2) If they couldn't connect with their units, they walked at least part of the way.
3) If you wanted to be a respected chef, that was the best training you could have.

1) and 2) represent habitual actions in the past. 3) represents a general fact as it existed in the past.
________
4) Davenport agreed to shave her head if she raised at least $2,000 for United Way.

In 4) "agreed to shave" takes the place of "agreed that she would shave".

4a) Davenport agreed that [she would shave her head if she raised ...].

The bracketed part is a normal second conditional.
________

5) If you missed the PSAT, ask your guidance counselor for some SAT prep materials.
6) If the cow jumped over the moon once, I don't know why she couldn't do it again.

5) has a past tense situation that triggers an imperative.
6) may look difficult to analyze, but it's derived from

If the cow jumped over the moon once, she could do it again.

CJ

Thank you very much for the answer.

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